laws

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laws

  • autonomy - From Greek autos, "self," and nomos, "law," i.e. a person or unit that makes its own laws.
  • blue sky laws - Laws protecting the public from securities fraud.
  • code, codex - Code, from Latin codex, meaning "block of wood split into tablets, document written on wood tablets," was first a set of laws.
  • constitute, constitution - Constitute can mean "make laws" and a constitution is a "how-to" document for a government or organization.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.laws - the first of three divisions of the Hebrew Scriptures comprising the first five books of the Hebrew Bible considered as a unitLaws - the first of three divisions of the Hebrew Scriptures comprising the first five books of the Hebrew Bible considered as a unit
Book of Genesis, Genesis - the first book of the Old Testament: tells of Creation; Adam and Eve; the Fall of Man; Cain and Abel; Noah and the flood; God's covenant with Abraham; Abraham and Isaac; Jacob and Esau; Joseph and his brothers
Book of Exodus, Exodus - the second book of the Old Testament: tells of the departure of the Israelites out of slavery in Egypt led by Moses; God gave them the Ten Commandments and the rest of Mosaic law on Mount Sinai during the Exodus
Book of Leviticus, Leviticus - the third book of the Old Testament; contains Levitical law and ritual precedents
Book of Numbers, Numbers - the fourth book of the Old Testament; contains a record of the number of Israelites who followed Moses out of Egypt
Book of Deuteronomy, Deuteronomy - the fifth book of the Old Testament; contains a second statement of Mosaic law
Old Testament - the collection of books comprising the sacred scripture of the Hebrews and recording their history as the chosen people; the first half of the Christian Bible
Hebrew Scripture, Tanach, Tanakh - the Jewish scriptures which consist of three divisions--the Torah and the Prophets and the Writings
References in periodicals archive ?
(1) Isaac Asimov's Laws of Robotics" are often referenced in productions wherein robots turn against their human masters.
Barry Nolan, Editorial Board member of The Boston Global Forum put it this way, "The ultimate aim is to create a global consensus on an idea nicely summed by Rule Number One of what came to be call Asimov's Laws, created in 1942 by the great science fiction author and former professor of biochemistry at Boston University Isaac Asimov, 'A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.'"
But his serious suggestions are motivational, to use his own term: Following Asimov's laws of robotics, one might install in the SI limited final goals, or try a set of goals out in a simpler, safer, system and then add into the full SI.
Even if no malicious code exists, the clash between the machines may lead to violations of Asimov's Laws. As another example, if a learning machine creates its own code, how is that process monitored and controlled?
"Asimov's laws of robotics: Implications for information technology." Roger Clarke's Web-Site.
And if intelligent machines are a potential threat, is there some way of programming them that will, like Asimov's Laws, keep them subservient to human will?
Almost no one wants to relinquish that operation to an autonomous system, dating back to the first of Isaac Asimov's laws of robotics: "A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm."