aspartate

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Related to Aspartate transaminase: Alanine transaminase

a·spar·tate

 (ə-spär′tāt)
n.
A salt or ester of aspartic acid.

aspartate

(əˈspɑːteɪt)
n
a salt formed from the amalgamation of a base and aspartic acid
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In the laboratory analysis, white blood cells: 4600/[mm.sup.3] (84% neutrophils), C-reactive protein: 25 mg/dL (normal: 0-0.5 mg/dL), creatinine: 0.9 mg/dL, aspartate transaminase: 181 U/L, and alanine transaminase: 79 U/L were detected.
For example, the FIGO diagnostic criteria for preterm (prior to 37 weeks) preeclampsia --which include the presence of intrauterine growth restriction, abnormal umbilical artery Doppler, stillbirth, platelet count less than 150,000 mcL, and aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase levels greater than 40 III--are markedly different from those recommended by ACOG, Dr.
Role of the Aspartate Transaminase and Platelet Ratio Index in Assessing Hepatic Fibrosis and Liver Inflammation in Adolescent Patients with HBeAg-Positive Chronic Hepatitis B.
Elevated liver enzymes were observed as follows: gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT; 156 U/L; normal range, 10-71 U/L), alanine transaminase (55 IU/L; normal range, 4-40 IU/L), and aspartate transaminase (90 IU/L; normal range, 4-35 IU/L).
The activity of serum aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) was estimated according to Reitman and Frankel (1957), serum I3-glutamyl transferase (GGT) was assessed according to Rosalki (1975) and serum alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) was assessed according to Kind and King (1954).
Deranged liver function test, i.e., high aspartate transaminase (AST) (>100 IU/L), high alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (>100 IU/L), and raised bilirubin (2 mg/dl) was found in 55 patients (41.98%).
The blood chemistry results were blood urea nitrogen (BUN), 80 mg/L; creatinine, 5.9 mg/L; aspartate transaminase, 16 U/L; alanine transaminase, 19 U/L; total bilirubin, 3.5 mg/L; lactate dehydrogenase, 182 U/L; C-reactive protein, 75.2 mg/L; and procalcitonin, 16.59 ng/ml.
Swansea diagnostic criteria [3] Laboratory Clinical Bilirubin >14 [micro]mol/L Vomiting Hypoglycaemia <4 mmol/L Abdominal pain Uric acid >340 [micro]mol/L Polydipsia and polyuria Leukocytosis >11x[10.sup.6]/L Encephalopathy AST/ALT >42 IU/L Ammonia >47 [micro]mol/L Creatinine >150 [micro]mol/L Coagulopathy, PT >14 s Laboratory Other Bilirubin >14 [micro]mol/L Ultrasound showing ascites/bright liver Hypoglycaemia <4 mmol/L Histology showing microvesicular steatosis Uric acid >340 [micro]mol/L Leukocytosis >11x[10.sup.6]/L AST/ALT >42 IU/L Ammonia >47 [micro]mol/L Creatinine >150 [micro]mol/L Coagulopathy, PT >14 s AST = aspartate transaminase; ALT = alanine transaminase; PT = prothrombin time.
The level of serum alkaline phosphatase (913 IU/L), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (1109 U/L), aspartate transaminase (178 U/L), alanine transaminase (280 U/L), and C-reactive protein (2.2 mg/dL) were markedly elevated.
Her postcholecystectomy laboratory values markedly improved, with an alanine transaminase of 131 U/L, aspartate transaminase of 43 U/L, and total bilirubin of 0.6 mg/dL.
Biochemical parameters such as aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), total protein, albumin, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine.