Asperger's disorder


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Asperger's disorder

n. Asperger, síndrome de, trastorno de la personalidad que en casos extremos se caracteriza por retraimiento social, falta de habilidad ocupacional, habla de estilo pedante y excesivo interés en asuntos banales.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although there is no epidemic, autism, Asperger's disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified are more common than previously believed and are an important public health issue.
Both Asperger's disorder and autism are included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual--IV, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) under "Pervasive Developmental Disorders," a term which itself is now falling out of use in favor of "autism spectrum disorders." Asperger's disorder is a unique diagnostic category in DSM-IV-TR, while children who meet the criteria for autism except for having normal intelligence are often classified under "atypical autism."
Haskins in which they contended that people with Asperger's disorder were overrepresented in forensic criminal settings (J.
In contrast, children with Asperger's disorder have no significant delay in language, although some experts believe that previous mild delays are acceptable as long as the child's language use is normal at the time he or she is assessed.
Buttross, a specialist in the division of child development and behavioral pediatrics at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, offered these guidelines to aid in recognition of Asperger's disorder, Rett syndrome, pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified, and childhood disintegrative disorder.
It follows that the social world can be quite complex for individuals with Asperger's Disorder given their difficulties in understanding emotions, interpreting other people's perspective and maintaining conversations.
"Asperger's Disorder and Non-Verbal Learning Disabilities: How are These Two Disorders Related to Each Other?" http://www.aane.org/asperger_resources/articles/miscellaneous/asperger nonverbal_learning.html
This particular issue is addressed is via an eighteen-year-old character with Asperger's Disorder.
In DSM-IV-TR, Asperger's disorder (AD), first described as "autistic psychopathy," (4) is categorized as a subtype of ASD in which the patient, without a history of language delay or mental retardation, has autistic social deficits that do not meet full criteria for autism.