asphaltum


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asphaltum

(ˈæsfæltəm)
n
1. (Art Terms) a substance used to protect surface areas of metal that do not require to be etched
2. (Art Terms) an oil colour, usually dark brown, used for metal surfaces and obtained by mixing asphaltum with oil
3. another name for asphalt
References in classic literature ?
And this ingenious Napoleon paves the streets of his great cities with a smooth, compact composition of asphaltum and sand.
Gliddon was of opinion, from the redness of the epidermis, that the embalmment had been effected altogether by asphaltum; but, on scraping the surface with a steel instrument, and throwing into the fire some of the powder thus obtained, the flavor of camphor and other sweet-scented gums became apparent.
Buckingham, "had no reference to your age at the period of interment (I am willing to grant, in fact, that you are still a young man), and my illusion was to the immensity of time during which, by your own showing, you must have been done up in asphaltum."
Whatever lay within the second compartment was not visible, for a cover lay over it and appeared to be sealed in place by asphaltum. In the bottom of the box, beside the clockwork, lay a key, and this Paulvitch now withdrew and fitted to the winding stem.
While in his recent show at the Grimm Gallery in Amsterdam ("Necrophilia," 2015-16) Heikes resorted to asphaltum, an oily, tar-like substance used both in printmaking and in ancient Egyptian embalming, here he seemed to choose to focus on the present, employing materials--mortar, cement, burlap, foam rubber, neoprene, rubber tubing--that are more evocative of a building site than of the workshop of an alchemist or an Egyptian embalmer.
In the ancient world, our ancestors encountered PAHs mostly in the form of fossil bitumen, or asphaltum. Fossil bitumen occurs in geological strata all over the planet.
Gesner tried in 1849 to patent a process to produce gas from asphaltum. Two cases, Abraham Gesner v.
Some ammo has a black sealer called asphaltum applied to the case before loading.
Other remains were drilled and bore traces of asphaltum, a tar-like oil collected for use as a caulking agent, which suggests to anthropologists that the shells might have been used as ceremonial rattles.