Azrael

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Azrael

(ˈæzreɪl; -rɪəl)
n
1. (Judaism) (in Jewish and Islamic angelology) the angel who separates the soul from the body at death
2. (Islam) (in Jewish and Islamic angelology) the angel who separates the soul from the body at death
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
Although A Summer's Tale--unlike the older, five-movement Symphony in cminor, Asrael, Op.
Brahms's Violin Concerto and Suk's Symphony No 2, 'Asrael'.
Few can forget Pesek's mighty performance - repeated at the BBC Proms - of the Asrael Symphony.
He and his second wife, the former Eve Stern, raised their two children, Jeremy and Deborah, in an apartment on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, (Yitshaq also had two sons from an earlier marriage.) Jeremy, born in 1962, attended the prestigious Collegiate School, but Asrael and its hardscrabble origins played a major part in his early years, which included annual summer visits.
"I'm going to talk about possibilities because right now all of our funds are waiting for approval," said Joel Asrael, manager of the GEO's commercial buildings program.
A piece like Josef Suk's Asrael Symphony, named after the Islamic angel of death and inspired by the deaths of his wife and father-in-law and teacher, Dvorak, might seem depressing, but its final resolution brings a resigned consolation which, funnily enough, you might almost call uplifting.
One landmark item which did make it to disc was Josef Suk's monumental Asrael (Angel of Death) Symphony by the Czech master Josef Suk, conducted then, as here, by the returning favourite Libor Pesek.
Rafael Kubelik conducts the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra in a spirited rendition of Josef Suk's Asrael, a moving tribute to his father-in-law, Dvorak.
His subsequent work, especially Asrael (1906) and Summer Tale (1909), marked a change from the light Romantic fare he had been producing.
As befits time-honored genre codes, the heist itself pivots on such out-of-nowhere variables as Czech composer Joseph Suk's "Asrael" pumped through a wayward walkie-talkie.
Other names in Zadig include the royal couple Moabdar and Astarte, Almona, Arbogad, Tchinavar, Asrael, and the place-names Arabie and 'gangaride'.