assassin bug

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assassin bug

n.
Any of various predatory insects of the family Reduviidae, having a short stout beak used to prey on other insects or, in certain genera, to suck blood from mammals. Also called reduviid.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

assassin bug

n
(Animals) any long-legged predatory, often blood-sucking, insect of the heteropterous family Reduviidae
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

assas′sin bug`


n.
any of various large bugs of the family Reduviidae, many of which kill and extract the blood of other insects and some of which are bloodsucking parasites of mammals.
[1890–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.assassin bug - a true bug: long-legged predacious bug living mostly on other insectsassassin bug - a true bug: long-legged predacious bug living mostly on other insects; a few suck blood of mammals
heteropterous insect - true bugs: insects whose forewings are membranous but have leathery tips
family Reduviidae, Reduviidae - assassin bugs
Arilus cristatus, wheel bug - large predatory North American bug that sucks the blood of other insects
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
These findings contribute to the considerations of the sticky plant trichome usage in assassin bugs, which evolved as an exogenous source of adhesive fluids in sticky trap strategy (Zhang et al.
There are many different kinds of assassin bugs. The one I found is called a giant wheel bug.
Species that use decoration usually cover the body first to protect their vital organs, like the larvae of many caddisfly species that build hard cases from whatever material they find, or assassin bugs who have the odd habit of carrying a shield of ant carcasses -- their number one prey -- to avoid being eaten by predators.
In assassin bugs, males also accumulate eggs from many females, like rheas.
Several species of generalist predators (e.g., lacewings, mantids, earwigs, lady beetles, assassin bugs, minute pirate bugs, big-eyed bugs and spiders) have been observed feeding on BMSB egg masses and motile stages in the field.
This exciting new exhibit features a whole range of fascinating insects and invertebrates including the mega mantis, giant prickly stick insects, blue bottle green tarantula, mombo assassin bugs, death feigning beetles, black beauty stick insects and much more.
Assassin bugs aren't picky: They will stab, poison and devour a wide range of garden pests, including caterpillars, leafhoppers and bean beetles.
New and little-known thread-legged assassin bugs from Australia and New Guinea (Heteroptera: Reduviidae: Emesinae).