assault weapon

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assault weapon

n.
Any of various automatic or semiautomatic firearms with detachable magazines and often other features such as a pistol grip or a collapsible stock, designed for individual use.
References in periodicals archive ?
He backed off his openness toward an assault weapons ban, support for expanded background checks, barring those who exhibit red flags from buying guns and raising the age to buy assault weapons to 21.
Do you think they should be able -- teachers should be able to carry assault weapons since presumably they may face assault weapons?
THE Florida Senate rejected a proposal to ban assault weapons and voted for a measure to arm some teachers, weeks after 17 people were killed in the deadliest high school shooting in United States history.
Bank of America added itself to the growing list of companies seeking to curtail assault weapons after a teenaged shooter on Feb.
A question right out of the gate asked whether the candidates support a ban on assault weapons like the AR-15 used by the Parkland school shooter.
Ordinary people should not be allowed to purchase assault weapons or anything else that can promote killing innocent victims.
The president rightly called for renewing the ban on military-style assault weapons -- like the one used by the Orlando gunman and so many other killers in mass shootings -- that expired in 2004.
Trump has abandoned his previous calls for an assault weapons ban.
The US Supreme Court on Monday rejected a challenge by gun rights activists to a Chicago suburb's ordinance banning assault weapons and large-capacity magazines, handing a victory to gun control advocates amid a fierce debate over the nation's firearms laws.
But in the 10 years since the previous ban lapsed, even gun control advocates acknowledge a larger truth: The law that barred the sale of assault weapons from 1994 to 2004 made little difference.
In a November 2013 study published in Applied Economics Letters, the Quinnipiac University economist Mark Gius sought to determine the effects of state-level assault weapons bans and concealed carry laws on gun-related murder rates between 1980 and 2009.
The lines began forming last month in localities throughout Connecticut, where in April the Legislature passed and the governor signed a law expanding the state's ban on assault weapons, banning the sale of magazines holding more than 10 rounds and requiring background checks for private gun purchases, including those at gun shows.