assertory


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assertory

(əˈsɜːtərɪ)
adj
characterized by or relating to declaration or affirmation
another word for assertoric
References in periodicals archive ?
First, she distinguishes between assertory oaths (sworn assertions about some past event) and promissory oaths (sworn commitments concerning the future); promissory oaths dominate, occurring in about 65% of the oath texts (excluding oath notations).
About 70% of Sandowicz's oath texts use this formula; it occurs in assertory and promissory oath texts and mainly in the first three text types.
(117) Act Rescissory 1661 (Scot); Act of Restitution 1661 (Scot); Act Enforcing the Ecclesiastical Settlement 1663 (Scot) m (13 Charles II st 2 c 1); Order of Council Against Ejected Ministers 1663 (Scot); Assertory Act 1669 (Scot); Test Act 1681 (Scot).
Those who find Weil's thought so irritating usually castigate her for a lack of rigor and coherence, made all the more infuriating (as Beauvoir found out) by her seemingly implacable certitude about everything and her assertory mien.
When Archbishop Burnet protested Charles's effort to tolerate Scottish Presbyterians in 1669, the Scottish Parliament passed the Assertory Act, which allowed the king to dismiss bishops summarily.
The perfect modal syllogism seems to follow the rule of assertory syllogisms (p.
(9.) For further discussion of judicial oaths, sometimes referred to as assertory oaths (in contrast to promissory oaths), see A.