Assiniboine

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As·sin·i·boin

also As·sin·i·boine  (ə-sĭn′ə-boin′)
n. pl. Assiniboin or As·sin·i·boins also Assiniboine or As·sin·i·boines
1. A member of a Native American people formerly inhabiting southern Manitoba, now located in Montana, Alberta, and Saskatchewan. The Assiniboin became nomadic buffalo hunters after migrating to the northern Great Plains in the 18th century.
2. The Siouan language of the Assiniboin. In both senses also called Nakota. See Usage Note at Nakota.

[French Assiniboine, of Ojibwa origin.]

As·sin′i·boin′ adj.

Assiniboine

, Mount
A mountain, 3,618 m (11,870 ft) high, in the Canadian Rocky Mountains on the Alberta-British Columbia border near Banff.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Assiniboine

(əˈsɪnɪˌbɔɪn)
n
(Placename) a river in W Canada, rising in E Saskatchewan and flowing southeast and east to the Red River at Winnipeg. Length: over 860 km (500 miles)

Assiniboine

(əˈsɪnəˌbɔɪn)
npl -boine or -boines
1. (Peoples) a member of a North American Indian people living in Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Montana; one of the Sioux peoples
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Siouan family
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

As•sin•i•boine

(əˈsɪn əˌbɔɪn)

n., pl. -boines, (esp. collectively) -boine.
1.
a. a member of a Plains Indian people living mainly between the middle Missouri and Saskatchewan rivers in the early 19th century: later confined to reserves in Montana and Alberta.
b. the dialect of Dakota spoken by the Assiniboine.
2. a river in S Canada, flowing S and E from SE Saskatchewan into the Red River in S Manitoba. 450 mi. (725 km) long.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first of these efforts, and the only one to be published during the project's tenure, was Land of Nakoda: The Story of the Assiniboine Indians by James Larpenteur Long.
Dusenberry used portions of the material for his article, "Notes on the Material Culture of the Assiniboine indians." (61) In 1980 the story of Garter Snake's father collected by Fred Gone was edited and published as The Seven Visions of Bull Lodge by George Horse Capture, also a member of the Gros Ventre tribe.
Written about 1854 and first published in 1928-29, this book is probably the most valuable record in existence about the Assiniboine Indians. The publishers are to be commended for reprinting it, and for including an excellent new introduction by David R.