Astarte

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Related to Astoreth: Chemosh

As·tar·te

 (ə-stär′tē)
n. Mythology
An ancient Semitic goddess of love and war, being the Phoenician, Syrian, and Canaanite counterpart to Ishtar. In the Bible, her name sometimes appears in the plural, perhaps referring to a group of goddesses. Also called Ashtoreth.

[Greek Astartē, of Phoenician origin; see ʕṯtr in Semitic roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Astarte

(æˈstɑːtɪ)
n
(Other Non-Christian Religions) a fertility goddess worshipped by the Phoenicians: identified with Ashtoreth of the Hebrews and Ishtar of the Babylonians and Assyrians
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

As•tar•te

(æˈstɑr ti)

n.
a Semitic goddess of fertility and reproduction worshiped by the Phoenicians and Canaanites.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Astarte - an ancient Phoenician goddess of love and fertilityAstarte - an ancient Phoenician goddess of love and fertility; the Phoenician counterpart to Ishtar
Phenicia, Phoenicia - an ancient maritime country (a collection of city states) at eastern end of the Mediterranean
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
With these in troop Came ASTORETH, whom the PHOENICIANS call'd ASTARTE, Queen of Heav'n, with crescent Horns; To whose bright Image nightly by the Moon SIDONIAN Virgins paid their Vows and Songs, In SION also not unsung, where stood Her Temple on th' offensive Mountain, built By that uxorious King, whose heart though large, Beguil'd by fair Idolatresses, fell To Idols foul.
Chemos's "other name" is Peor (I.412); Astoreth is called "Astarte, Queen of Heav'n" (I.439) by the Phoenicians; and Baalim and Ashtaroth, being spirits, "can either sex assume or both, so soft / And uncompounded is their essence pure" (I.424-25).
Milton gives a catalog of the most notable devils, including Moloch, Chemos, Astoreth, Thammuz, and Belial.