public key cryptography

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Related to Asymmetric encryption: Asymmetric key encryption

public key cryptography

n.
Any of various techniques that use two different keys whereby data encrypted with one key can only be decrypted using the other. In typical use, the recipient makes one key public and keeps the other private, so that anyone may encrypt data for the recipient, but only the recipient can decrypt it.
References in periodicals archive ?
The HSM uses hardware-based symmetric and asymmetric encryption algorithms as well as hash functions (AES-128, ECC 256, SHA2).
The Axiomtek's NA362 features the Intel[R] QuickAssist Technology (Intel[R] QAT) for accelerated data processing including symmetric encryption and authentication, asymmetric encryption, digital signatures, RSA, DH, ECC and lossless data compression," said Jack Chen, a product manager of the Network Appliances Division at Axiomtek.
Asymmetric encryption methods are regarded as more secure than symmetric ones.
Similar to conventional cryptography, the core nature of a HE scheme is to protect the confidentiality and privacy of data by encrypting the data either by using the same pair of secret keys (known as symmetric encryption scheme) or different pair of secret keys (known as asymmetric encryption scheme).
Asymmetric encryption algorithms (called as public-key algorithms) need a key of 3,000 bits to produce the same level of security as that of a symmetric algorithm with a 128-bit key.
The symmetric key is then encrypted with an asymmetric encryption algorithm (RSA) and is prepended to the file, along with the IV used by AES.
Most variants use RSA asymmetric encryption, but CTB-Locker actually makes use of elliptical curve encryption, which, according to Cisco, still provides the same level of public and private key encryption but uses a different type of algorithm; it also offers lower overhead and the same level of security within a smaller key space.
In contrast, asymmetric encryption has both a public and a private key.
One solution is asymmetric encryption in which there are two related keys--a key pair.
With hackers operating on the inside, attempting to extract data by leveraging legitimate users' access, enterprises must respond with better processes for managing and auditing all means of access to critical data--whether user accounts or the asymmetric encryption keys that are used as credentials by applications and servers.
He begins by introducing the topic and the cryptographic systems used today, then addresses each in turn, with discussion of one-way functions, hash functions, random bit generators, symmetric and asymmetric encryption systems, message authentication codes, pseudorandom bit generators and functions, digital signature systems, key establishment, entity authentication, secure multiparty computation, and key management.
In asymmetric encryption, or "public key" cryptography, different keys are used.

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