Atchafalaya River


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A·tchaf·a·lay·a River

 (ə-chăf′ə-lī′ə)
A river, about 270 km (170 mi) long, of south-central Louisiana formed near the confluence of the Red and Mississippi Rivers and flowing south into Atchafalaya Bay, an inlet of the Gulf of Mexico.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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-- Mouth of the Atchafalaya River to Shell Beach: 3 to 6 feet
Without what's known as the Old River Control Structure, the Mississippi River would likely shift course to Atchafalaya River in Louisiana, which offers a shorter, steeper route to the Gulf of Mexico.
Effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on sport fish community abundance in the eastern Atchafalaya River basin, Louisiana.
Information is also lacking regarding N inputs to specific areas along the coasts, such as difference between the Atchafalaya River delta.
Note in particular the Atchafalaya River challenge to the Mississippi above Baton Rouge (McPhee, 1987; Madrigal, 2011), a battle between Mother Nature diverting waters away from the mainstream and directing these westward into Texas, and the Army Corps of Engineers heroically attempting to prevent this "pirating" by erecting cement bulwarks to keep the river where it now locates, saving waters for ports in the New Orleans area.
A barge worker takes a break while waiting for his boat to "lock" through from the Mississippi onto the Atchafalaya River.
gas pipeline traveling through the waters of the Atchafalaya River and
The combination of PDO, AMO, and NAO and the coupling of AMO and NAO phases were found to be important drivers of long-term flows in the Mississippi River and Atchafalaya River and in the Pearl River and Pascagoula River, respectively (Sanchez-Rubio et al., 2011a).
Over the past five years, the Environmental Protection Agency has made little progress on reducing the size of the annual "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico, a shortcoming that could be addressed by a better system to monitor and track progress in reducing nitrogen and phosphorus discharges in the Mississippi and Atchafalaya river basins, according to a new report by EPA's Office of the Inspector General (IG).
There is no difference in the degree of lecithotrophy between coastal (Atchafalaya river, only 250 km in length) and far-upstream populations in the Mississippi river (Olivier et al., 2012).
scovelli in Lake Saint John, an oxbow of the Mississippi River near Ferriday, Louisiana, but could not confirm that this was a self-sustaining population because the larvae born in his freshwater aquarium died and he reported a possible route to enter the lake when flood events connect the lake to the Atchafalaya River via some small creeks.