Delian League

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Delian League

or

Delian Confederacy

n
(Historical Terms) an alliance of ancient Greek states formed in 478–77 bc to fight Persia

Delian League

A confederacy of Greek city-states led by Athens against Persia.
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Thucydides sees Themistocles as the one who spurred Athens into becoming a sea power, thereby laying the foundations of the Athenian empire.
The 27-year Peloponnesian War, fought from 431 to 404 BC between the Athenian Empire and the Peloponnesian League, headed by Sparta, was a pivotal event in the development of Western Civilization, but it is almost unknown to most people-and I think I know why: Because despite its earth-shaking episodes, crazy twists and turns, plots and puzzles, history teachers and the writers of history books have succeeded in making this momentous story duller than dirt.
She argues that the increasing connectivity of the Classical world--which included the Aegean region; the Athenian Empire in the fifth century BC; areas conquered by Alexander the Great; and an increasingly vast Roman Empire--gave rise to the development of money, monetary systems such as coinage, as well as to complex monetary networks.
City of Suppliants: Tragedy and the Athenian Empire.
Beginning in about the twelfth century, the Venetian "Empire" was a fluid one, and can be compared to the short-lived Athenian Empire a millennium and a half earlier.
The benefits of the early Athenian Empire in maintaining security and fostering economic growth, before hubris and strategic overreach doomed it, are analyzed by Donald Kagan in "Pericles, Thucydides, and the Defense of Empire.
Golf next discusses tragedy in 415 BCE, making a pointed connection between later Euripides and the later Athenian empire.
This edition incorporates new scholarship and more on the Delian League and the Athenian Empire, more sources, and extended discussion of the growth of Athenian imperialism towards Samos, Mytilene, and Melos.
He was as interested in the trees and timber of the ancient Mediterranean as he was in the politics, economics and ideology of the fifth-century BC Athenian empire and was more expert in the archaeology and history of the Roman port of Ostia than of Peiraieus.
Steiner, "The mbqr at Qumran, the episkopos in the Athenian Empire, and the Meaning of Ibqr' in Ezra 7:14: On the Relation of Ezra's Mission to the Persian Legal Project," JBL 120 [2001]: 623-46.
Her focus then narrows to Athens, as she explores the record of his arrival in the city, the topography of his Athenian cult, and his place and role in the Athenian empire.
Athens had evolved into an Athenian Empire (the following from Fornara, 1977).