Athens


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Ath·ens

 (ăth′ənz)
1. The capital and largest city of Greece, in the eastern part of the country near the Saronic Gulf. It was at the height of its cultural achievements and imperial power in the fifth century bc during the time of Pericles. Athens became the capital of modern Greece in 1834, two years after the country achieved its independence from Turkey.
2. A city of northeast Georgia east-northeast of Atlanta. It was founded in 1785 as the site of the University of Georgia, which was chartered that year and established in 1801.

Athens

(ˈæθɪnz)
n
(Placename) the capital of Greece, in the southeast near the Saronic Gulf: became capital after independence in 1834; ancient city-state, most powerful in the 5th century bc; contains the hill citadel of the Acropolis. Pop: 3 238 000 (2005 est). Greek name: Athinai or Athina

Ath•ens

(ˈæθ ɪnz)

n.
1. Greek, A•the•nai (ɑˈθi nɛ) the capital of Greece, in the SE part. 885,136: ancient city-state.
2. a city in N Georgia. 42,549.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Athens - the capital and largest city of GreeceAthens - the capital and largest city of Greece; named after Athena (its patron goddess); "in the 5th century BC ancient Athens was the world's most powerful and civilized city"
Parthenon - the main temple of the goddess Athena; built on the acropolis in Athens more than 400 years B.C.; example of Doric architecture
Ellas, Greece, Hellenic Republic - a republic in southeastern Europe on the southern part of the Balkan peninsula; known for grapes and olives and olive oil
Areopagus - a hill to the to the west of the Athenian acropolis where met the highest governmental council of ancient Athens and later a judicial court
Dipylon, Dipylon gate - a gateway to the west of ancient Athens near which a distinctive style of pottery has been found
Athenian - a resident of Athens
Plato - ancient Athenian philosopher; pupil of Socrates; teacher of Aristotle (428-347 BC)
2.Athens - a town in southeast OhioAthens - a town in southeast Ohio    
Buckeye State, OH, Ohio - a midwestern state in north central United States in the Great Lakes region
3.Athens - a university town in northeast GeorgiaAthens - a university town in northeast Georgia
Empire State of the South, Georgia, Peach State, GA - a state in southeastern United States; one of the Confederate states during the American Civil War
Translations
Атина
AtényAthény
Ateena
Ateena
Athén
아테네
Athenae
Atėnai
Atēnas
Ateny
Atena
Atene
Atina

Athens

[ˈæθɪnz] NAtenas f

Athens

[ˈæθɪnz] nAthènes
in Athens → à Athènes

Athens

nAthen nt

Athens

[ˈæθɪnz] nAtene f
References in classic literature ?
Here she often talked with her son about his father, and said that he was called Aegeus, and that he was a great king, and ruled over Attica, and dwelt at Athens, which was as famous a city as any in the world.
Well, but, dear mother," asked the boy, "why cannot I go to this famous city of Athens, and tell King Aegeus that I am his son?
at my time of life I ought not to be appearing before you, O men of Athens, in the character of a juvenile orator--let no one expect it of me.
There is at this time a Parian philosopher residing in Athens, of whom I have heard; and I came to hear of him in this way:--I came across a man who has spent a world of money on the Sophists, Callias, the son of Hipponicus, and knowing that he had sons, I asked him: 'Callias,' I said, 'if your two sons were foals or calves, there would be no difficulty in finding some one to put over them; we should hire a trainer of horses, or a farmer probably, who would improve and perfect them in their own proper virtue and excellence; but as they are human beings, whom are you thinking of placing over them?
WREATHED in myrtle, my sword I'll conceal Like those champions devoted and brave, When they plunged in the tyrant their steel, And to Athens deliverance gave.
When the Dolphin arrived with his burden in sight of land not far from Athens, he asked the Monkey if he were an Athenian.
Socrates proceeds:--Suppose the Laws of Athens to come and remonstrate with him: they will ask 'Why does he seek to overturn them?
The fact that he had been neutral in the death-struggle of Athens was not likely to conciliate popular good-will.
At Athens too the disposition of the citizens is not the same, for those who live in the Piraeus are more attached to a popular government than those who live in the city properly so called; for as the interposition of a rivulet, however small, will occasion the line of the phalanx to fluctuate, so any trifling disagreement will be the cause of seditions; but they will not so soon flow from anything else as from the disagreement between virtue and vice, and next to that between poverty and riches, and so on in order, one cause having more influence than another; one of which that I last mentioned.
Athens, as we learn from Demosthenes, was the arbiter of Greece seventy-three years.
A day will be spent here, and leaving in the evening, the course will be taken towards Athens.
or, more probably, attributing the victory to the ancient good order of Athens and to the favor of Apollo and Athene.