Athens


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Ath·ens

 (ăth′ənz)
1. The capital and largest city of Greece, in the eastern part of the country near the Saronic Gulf. It was at the height of its cultural achievements and imperial power in the fifth century bc during the time of Pericles. Athens became the capital of modern Greece in 1834, two years after the country achieved its independence from Turkey.
2. A city of northeast Georgia east-northeast of Atlanta. It was founded in 1785 as the site of the University of Georgia, which was chartered that year and established in 1801.

Athens

(ˈæθɪnz)
n
(Placename) the capital of Greece, in the southeast near the Saronic Gulf: became capital after independence in 1834; ancient city-state, most powerful in the 5th century bc; contains the hill citadel of the Acropolis. Pop: 3 238 000 (2005 est). Greek name: Athinai or Athina

Ath•ens

(ˈæθ ɪnz)

n.
1. Greek, A•the•nai (ɑˈθi nɛ) the capital of Greece, in the SE part. 885,136: ancient city-state.
2. a city in N Georgia. 42,549.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Athens - the capital and largest city of GreeceAthens - the capital and largest city of Greece; named after Athena (its patron goddess); "in the 5th century BC ancient Athens was the world's most powerful and civilized city"
Parthenon - the main temple of the goddess Athena; built on the acropolis in Athens more than 400 years B.C.; example of Doric architecture
Ellas, Greece, Hellenic Republic - a republic in southeastern Europe on the southern part of the Balkan peninsula; known for grapes and olives and olive oil
Areopagus - a hill to the to the west of the Athenian acropolis where met the highest governmental council of ancient Athens and later a judicial court
Dipylon, Dipylon gate - a gateway to the west of ancient Athens near which a distinctive style of pottery has been found
Athenian - a resident of Athens
Plato - ancient Athenian philosopher; pupil of Socrates; teacher of Aristotle (428-347 BC)
2.Athens - a town in southeast OhioAthens - a town in southeast Ohio    
Buckeye State, OH, Ohio - a midwestern state in north central United States in the Great Lakes region
3.Athens - a university town in northeast GeorgiaAthens - a university town in northeast Georgia
Empire State of the South, Georgia, Peach State, GA - a state in southeastern United States; one of the Confederate states during the American Civil War
Translations
Атина
AtényAthény
Ateena
Ateena
Athén
아테네
Athenae
Atėnai
Atēnas
Ateny
Atena
Atene
Atina

Athens

[ˈæθɪnz] NAtenas f

Athens

[ˈæθɪnz] nAthènes
in Athens → à Athènes

Athens

nAthen nt

Athens

[ˈæθɪnz] nAtene f
References in classic literature ?
When I long to go abroad and study, I always remember that there were three great schools in Athens and two in Jerusalem, but the Teacher of all teachers came out of Nazareth, a little village hidden away from the bigger, busier world.
As when of old som Orator renound In ATHENS or free ROME, where Eloquence Flourishd, since mute, to som great cause addrest, Stood in himself collected, while each part, Motion, each act won audience ere the tongue, Somtimes in highth began, as no delay Of Preface brooking through his Zeal of Right.
When Don Lorenzo had finished reciting his gloss, Don Quixote stood up, and in a loud voice, almost a shout, exclaimed as he grasped Don Lorenzo's right hand in his, "By the highest heavens, noble youth, but you are the best poet on earth, and deserve to be crowned with laurel, not by Cyprus or by Gaeta- as a certain poet, God forgive him, said- but by the Academies of Athens, if they still flourished, and by those that flourish now, Paris, Bologna, Salamanca.
Socrates proceeds:--Suppose the Laws of Athens to come and remonstrate with him: they will ask 'Why does he seek to overturn them?
Sparta, Athens, Rome, and Carthage were all republics; two of them, Athens and Carthage, of the commercial kind.
Theseus first, and after him Draco and Solon, instituted the government of Athens.
The Brahmin legends assert that this city is built on the site of the ancient Casi, which, like Mahomet's tomb, was once suspended between heaven and earth; though the Benares of to-day, which the Orientalists call the Athens of India, stands quite unpoetically on the solid earth, Passepartout caught glimpses of its brick houses and clay huts, giving an aspect of desolation to the place, as the train entered it.
Greece only had risen against Turkey, and had begun her war of independence; all eyes were turned towards Athens -- it was the fashion to pity and support the Greeks.
For seven years after he had killed Agamemnon he ruled in Mycene, and the people were obedient under him, but in the eighth year Orestes came back from Athens to be his bane, and killed the murderer of his father.
The Spartans held Athens and Thebes, establishing there an oligarchy, nevertheless they lost them.
Again, we say that there are many people in a village, and few in Athens, although those in the city are many times as numerous as those in the village: or we say that a house has many in it, and a theatre few, though those in the theatre far outnumber those in the house.
Here she often talked with her son about his father, and said that he was called Aegeus, and that he was a great king, and ruled over Attica, and dwelt at Athens, which was as famous a city as any in the world.