athetosis

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athetosis

(ˌæθəˈtəʊsɪs)
n
(Pathology) pathol a condition characterized by uncontrolled rhythmic writhing movement, esp of fingers, hands, head, and tongue, caused by cerebral lesion
[C19: from Greek athetos not in place, from a-1 + tithenai to place]
ˈatheˌtoid adj
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.athetosis - a continuous succession of slow, writhing, involuntary movements of the hands and feet and other body parts
nervous disorder, neurological disease, neurological disorder - a disorder of the nervous system
Translations

ath·e·to·sis

n. atetosis, condición con síntomas de contracciones involuntarias en las manos y los dedos y movimientos sin coordinación de las extremidades, esp. los brazos.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cerebral palsy can be categorized into spastic, athetoid, ataxic, low tone and mixed4.
The extensor tone is increased in the athetoid and spastic CP child with retained tonic labyrinthine reflex.20 This study aimed at inhibiting the extensor tone posture and retained TLR with the help of proper positioning in hammock and the CP chair.
CP is commonly classified as spastic (causing muscle weakness or stiffness--may be hemiplegia, diplegia, quadraplegia), athetoid (affecting muscle tone and causing involuntary spasms), ataxic (affecting balance and co-ordination) or mixed (combination of the above).
The teenager was diagnosed with severe athetoid cerebral palsy, which has left him unable to walk, with limited mobility, learning difficulties and needing 24-hour care.
Bilirubin-related neurotoxicity can result in neonatal death or multisystem acute manifestations and long-term impairments, including irreversible athetoid cerebral palsy (CP) and speech, visuomotor, auditory, and other sensory-processing disabilities [21-23].
Chronic cerebellar stimulation applied to the superomedial cortex has been used to reduce generalized cerebral spasticity, athetoid movements, and seizures [58].
Jaundice turns the child's skin yellow and could lead to brain damage or athetoid cerebral palsy and hearing loss.
[3] TD is characterized by abnormal and involuntary movements (such as choreiform, athetoid and rhythmic) on orofacial, extremities, or even truncal region.
Involuntary athetoid [writhing] or choreiform [jerking] movements (lasting at least a few weeks) generally of the tongue, lower face and jaw, and extremities (but sometimes involving the pharyngeal, diaphragmatic, trunk muscles) developing in association with the use of a neuroleptic medication for at least a few months.
Marked athetoid writhing of the trunk, arms and legs - worse distally and with eyes closed, disappearing while asleep; an ataxic, wide-based gait with left foot drop (power 2/5); a complete right peripheral facial nerve palsy; right-sided fixed-flexion deformity of the first, third and fourth digits and fixed extension of the wrist (Figure 1); anaesthesia of the lower limbs to the level of the mid-tibia, with preservation of sensation on the dorsum of the right foot and loss of proprioception and vibration in the upper limbs to the elbow and in the left lower limb to the knee.
Clinical manifestations of hypomagnesemia are carpopedal spasm, muscle cramp, muscle weakness, tremor, convulsions, athetoid movements, and cardiac abnormalities including atrial tachycardia, fibrillation, and supraventricular arrhythmia (1,2).