Atholl brose


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Atholl brose

(ˈæθəl)
n
(Brewing) Scot a mixture of whisky and honey left to ferment before consumption
[C19: after Atholl, a district of central Scotland]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sweet wines from Sauternes work equally well with Burns Night Atholl Brose desserts or with blue cheeses.
Atholl Brose liqueur, is a recreation of the original Drambuie, according to Dan Smith, general manager of the Queen Mary Tavern in Chicago.
In Scotland, Atholl brose is a fermented mix of which two ingredients?
Here it will be appropriate to consider the collocation (and collation) Atholl brose, the mixture of oat water, whisky, cream and honey.
Forms 1 and 2 coalesced in Scots bruise, while the Irish term (irrespective of the folklore-coloured name Atholl brose) may have contributed to the development of the simplex brose 'oatmeal and boiling water'.
It's the healthy stuff all the way and the centrepiece was the strangely-named Atholl Brose. Sounds like a good name for a cat, but this was toasted oats, yoghurt, raspberries and honey - basically cold porridge with fruit and honey - plus an orange, pomegranate and pineapple smoothie that looked at first glimpse like chocolate angel delight.
Make them a delicious alternative to salt and water called Atholl Brose which is deal for either breakfast or a dessert.
A key Scottish ingredient, oats are employed in nutritious porridges, puddings, unleavened griddle-cooked bread called bannock, ubiquitous biscuit-like oatcakes, and even beverages, such as "Atholl Brose," which uses oat water.
So we settle for Barb's delicious scones from a traditional mix, salsa and chips (a nod to the influence of Scottish Mexicans), and Nick's heavenly atholl brose. Very much a traditional Scottish drink, atholl brose consists of eggs, cream, oatmeal, honey, whiskey, and at least a week of "aging." But due to popular demand, Nick has speeded up the process to under fifteen minutes by simply adding the honey, whiskey, and cream to boiling water.