Atlanticist


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At·lan·ti·cism

 (ăt-lăn′tĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
Advocation of or support for cooperation among western European and North American nations regarding political, economic, and defense issues.

At·lan′ti·cist n.
Translations

Atlanticist

[ətˈlæntɪsɪst] ADJ & Natlantista mf
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence the need for President Trump to move away from the Middle East-centric perspective of an Atlanticist establishment that is visceral in its dislike of him and the ideas he represents and visit India and Indonesia as well, having already been (as President of the United States) to the most populated country on the globe, China.
Its strongly Atlanticist tone had already sparked considerable debate in the EP Committee on Foreign Affairs.
But just yesterday, the former Foreign Secretary, Lord Owen, a leading Atlanticist, was airing his fears the European Commission wanted closer convergence, and to take over states' foreign and defence policy decisions.
This has resulted in a fightback from the well-funded Atlanticist establishment in the US, which interestingly includes several think-tanks and universities based on the West Coast of the US as well.
This ambitious approach raises questions among the most Atlanticist member states, such as Britain or the Netherlands, which fear a new French plot to undermine the transatlantic alliance and NATO at a time when the US is focused on its election campaign.
And, despite a more marked Atlanticist commitment than in the past, it reiterates its preoccupation with a more integrated European commitment.
In spite of a rather Atlanticist approach - openness to being more involved in Afghanistan in particular - the document reiterates Belgium's "European ambition".
Socha told the conference that the US needed to take a pause from its "love affair" with Sarkozy because while the French president might be an Atlanticist, the French people were not.
Back in Europe, the front runner to be elected French president in 2007, Nicolas Sarkozy, is making waves with his atlanticist leanings.
The other major political gamble for Mr Blair is his relationship with the new member states from Central and Eastern Europe who are generally supportive of the UK's Atlanticist, more free market approach.
Instead of it being, as widely predicted, the dastardly Atlanticist British in splendid isolation against the Constitution (with perhaps the Czechs) it is two founding member states who are saying No, making it even harder to dismiss the votes.
Moreover, von der Leyen is undeniably pro-European and Atlanticist. And as a former German defense minister, she is familiar with the increasingly critical security issues facing Europe.