nuclear weapon

(redirected from Atombomb)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

nuclear weapon

n.
A weapon, such as an atomic bomb or hydrogen bomb, whose destructive power comes from the release of nuclear energy.

nu′clear weap′on


n.
an explosive device whose destructive potential derives from the release of energy that accompanies the splitting or combining of atomic nuclei.
[1945–50]

nuclear weapon

A weapon whose destructive power comes from nuclear energy; an atomic bomb or a hydrogen bomb. Also called thermonuclear weapon.

nuclear weapon

A complete assembly (i.e., implosion type, gun type, or thermonuclear type), in its intended ultimate configuration which, upon completion of the prescribed arming, fusing, and firing sequence, is capable of producing the intended nuclear reaction and release of energy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nuclear weapon - a weapon of mass destruction whose explosive power derives from a nuclear reactionnuclear weapon - a weapon of mass destruction whose explosive power derives from a nuclear reaction
A-bomb, atom bomb, atomic bomb, fission bomb, plutonium bomb - a nuclear weapon in which enormous energy is released by nuclear fission (splitting the nuclei of a heavy element like uranium 235 or plutonium 239)
atomic warhead, nuclear warhead, nuke, thermonuclear warhead - the warhead of a missile designed to deliver an atom bomb
fusion bomb, H-bomb, hydrogen bomb, thermonuclear bomb - a nuclear weapon that releases atomic energy by union of light (hydrogen) nuclei at high temperatures to form helium
megaton bomb - a nuclear weapon with an explosive power equivalent to one million tons of TNT
W.M.D., weapon of mass destruction, WMD - a weapon that kills or injures civilian as well as military personnel (nuclear and chemical and biological weapons)
References in periodicals archive ?
As austerity turned into never having it so good, an undercurrent of anxiety reflected the legacy of war - the philosophicalmeaning of death camps, the political realignment of the cold war and reality of the atombomb.
Inareport released by the National Archives this week from 1955, Cardiff was listed as one of the top targets for a Soviet atombomb similar to the one dropped by the United States on Nagasaki at the end of World War II.
They then comment on the failure of the Venona releases to corroborate the evidence used against the Rosenbergs during their trial: there were "no drawing of lens molds, no sketch of the atombomb itself,' no Jell-O box recognition device or password using Julius's name -- in short, none of the testimony so essential in convicting Julius is verified.