International Atomic Time

(redirected from Atomic Time)
Also found in: Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

International Atomic Time

n
(Horology) the scientific standard of time based on the SI unit, the second, used by means of atomic clocks and satellites to synchronize the time standards of the major nations. Abbreviation: TAI

International Atomic Time

The time reference scale established by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures on the basis of atomic clock readings from various laboratories around the world. Also called TAI.
References in periodicals archive ?
Atomic time seemed a perfect wedding of nature and science, a harnessing of the unimaginable precision of the universe.
The main reason for the nearly annual adjustment we need now is a mismatch between the definition of the second in terms of atomic time and that in terms of the average speed of the Earth's rotation.
Coordinated Universal Time is apparently 32 seconds behind International Atomic Time because one adds leap seconds and the other doesn't.
To mention only a few: relativistic effects, Barycentric Dynamical Time, measurement of Atomic Time, clock synchronization by very-long-baseline interferometry, planetary terms in nutation (used only for arc-millisecond accuracy
1, 2017, UTC - based on astronomical timekeeping - will be 37 seconds behind atomic time.
Atomic Time Synchronization With Class Change Tones Utilizing Multiple, Programmable Schedules For Each Zone,
In 1955, the first accurate caesium atomic clock was developed, leading to the international agreed definition of the second being based on atomic time.
To stop using the additional 'leap seconds' would keep us strictly on atomic time - measured by incredibly precise reactions in caesium atoms.
The cell phone, thumb-drive flash storage, watches set to atomic time, the iPod, digital cameras (scratch that--they're usually gizmos), pens that photograph what they're writing so a computer can store the cursive output and translate it into digital text--these all display genius and serve useful purposes.
To keep Earth time and atomic time in sync, experts have agreed to insert a leap second every few years into the official atomic-based standard, which is called Coordinated Universal Time.
Stamatakos explained the addition of an extra second to the UTC, which stands for Co-ordinated Universal Time, was done to ensure the rate of the UTC was in coordination with the atomic time.