oxygen

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Related to Atomic oxygen: Dioxygen, Diatomic Oxygen

ox·y·gen

 (ŏk′sĭ-jən)
n. Symbol O
A nonmetallic element constituting 21 percent of the atmosphere by volume that occurs as a diatomic gas, O2, and in many compounds such as water and silica, and in iron ore. It combines with most elements, is essential for plant and animal respiration, and is required for nearly all combustion. Ozone, O3, is an allotrope of this element. Atomic number 8; atomic weight 15.9994; melting point -218.79°C; boiling point -182.9°C; gas density at 0°C 1.429 grams per liter; valence 2. See Periodic Table.

[French oxygène : Greek oxus, sharp, acid; see ak- in Indo-European roots + French -gène, -gen.]

ox′y·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
ox′y·gen′i·cal·ly adv.
ox·yg′e·nous (ŏk-sĭj′ə-nəs) adj.
Word History: One of the most important substances on earth is misnamed. The word oxygen is the Anglicized form of French oxygène, the name for the element proposed in a work entitled Méthode de nomenclature chimique (1787) by a collaborative of chemists including Antoine Laurent Lavoisier, Louis Bernard de Guyton de Morveau, Claude Louis Berthollet, and Antoine François de Fourcroy. (Oxygen had been discovered a few years before by Joseph Priestley in 1774, and he had called the gas dephlogisticated air.) The same publication also introduced the French words that were soon adopted into English as hydrogen and sodium chloride (common salt), among other terms commonly used in chemistry. The French word oxygène was intended to mean "acid-producing," from the Greek word oxus, "sharp," used in the sense "acid," and the Greek suffix -genes, "born," misinterpreted as "producing." At the time oxygen was thought to be an essential component of an acid. Although this is not the case, the name oxygen has persisted for the element.

oxygen

(ˈɒksɪdʒən)
n
(Elements & Compounds)
a. a colourless odourless highly reactive gaseous element: the most abundant element in the earth's crust (49.2 per cent). It is essential for aerobic respiration and almost all combustion and is widely used in industry. Symbol: O; atomic no: 8; atomic wt: 15.9994; valency: 2; density: 1.429 kg/m3; melting pt: –218.79°C; boiling pt: –182.97°C
b. (as modifier): an oxygen mask.
oxygenic, oxygenous adj

ox•y•gen

(ˈɒk sɪ dʒən)

n.
a colorless, odorless, gaseous element constituting about one-fifth of the volume of the atmosphere and present in a combined state in nature. Symbol: O; at. wt.: 15.9994; at. no.: 8; density: 1.4290 g/l at 0°C and 760 mm pressure.
[1780–90; < French oxygène (1786), short for principe oxygène acidifying principle; see oxy-1, -gen]
ox`y•gen′ic (-ˈdʒɛn ɪk) ox•yg′e•nous (-ˈsɪdʒ ə nəs) adj.

ox·y·gen

(ŏk′sĭ-jən)
Symbol O A nonmetallic element that exists in its free form as a colorless, odorless gas and makes up about 21 percent of the Earth's atmosphere. It is the most abundant element in the Earth's crust and occurs in many compounds, including water, carbon dioxide, and iron ore. Oxygen combines with most elements, is required for combustion, and is essential for life in most organisms. Atomic number 8. See Periodic Table.
Word History In 1786, the French chemist Antoine Lavoisier coined a term for the element oxygen (oxygène in French). He used Greek words for the coinage: oxy- means "sharp," and -gen means "producing." Oxygen was called the "sharp-producing" element because it was thought to be essential for making acids. Lavoisier also coined the name of the element hydrogen, the "water-producing" element, in 1788. Soon after, in 1791, another French chemist, J. A. Chaptal, introduced the word nitrogen, the "niter-producing" element, referring to its discovery from an analysis of nitric acid.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oxygen - a nonmetallic bivalent element that is normally a colorless odorless tasteless nonflammable diatomic gasoxygen - a nonmetallic bivalent element that is normally a colorless odorless tasteless nonflammable diatomic gas; constitutes 21 percent of the atmosphere by volume; the most abundant element in the earth's crust
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
liquid oxygen, LOX - a bluish translucent magnetic liquid obtained by compressing gaseous oxygen and then cooling it below its boiling point; used as an oxidizer in rocket propellants
air - a mixture of gases (especially oxygen) required for breathing; the stuff that the wind consists of; "air pollution"; "a smell of chemicals in the air"; "open a window and let in some air"; "I need some fresh air"
H2O, water - binary compound that occurs at room temperature as a clear colorless odorless tasteless liquid; freezes into ice below 0 degrees centigrade and boils above 100 degrees centigrade; widely used as a solvent
gas - a fluid in the gaseous state having neither independent shape nor volume and being able to expand indefinitely
ozone - a colorless gas (O3) soluble in alkalis and cold water; a strong oxidizing agent; can be produced by electric discharge in oxygen or by the action of ultraviolet radiation on oxygen in the stratosphere (where it acts as a screen for ultraviolet radiation)
Translations
suurstof
أكسجينأُكْسِجيـنأوكسجين
кислород
oxigen
kyslík
iltoxygen
oksigeno
hapnik
اکسیژن
happi
आक्सीजन
kisik
oxigén
oxygeno
oksigenzat asamzat pembakar
súrefni
酸素
산소
oxygenium
deguonisdeguonies kaukė
skābeklis
ഓക്സിജന്‍
oxigen
kyslík
kisik
кисеоник
syresyrgas
oksijeni
ออกซิเจน
кисень
آکسیجن
khí Ôxyôxy

oxygen

[ˈɒksɪdʒən]
A. Noxígeno m
to give sb the oxygen of publicityhacer propaganda gratuita a algn
B. CPD oxygen mask Nmáscara f de oxígeno, mascarilla f de oxígeno
oxygen tent Ncámara f de oxígeno

oxygen

[ˈɒksɪdʒən]
noxygène m
modif [atom, molecule] → d'oxygène; [level, consumption] → d'oxygène; [deprivation, starvation] → en oxygène

oxygen

nSauerstoff m; the oxygen of publicity (fig)öffentlichkeitswirksame Auftritte pl

oxygen

:
oxygen bottle, oxygen cylinder
oxygen mask
oxygen tank
nSauerstoffbehälter m
oxygen tent
nSauerstoffzelt nt

oxygen

[ˈɒksɪdʒn] nossigeno

oxygen

(ˈoksidʒən) noun
an element, a gas without taste, colour or smell, forming part of the air. He died from lack of oxygen.
oxygen mask
a mask through which a person can breathe oxygen.

oxygen

أُكْسِجيـن kyslík ilt Sauerstoff οξυγόνο oxígeno happi oxygène kisik ossigeno 酸素 산소 zuurstof oksygen tlen oxigénio, oxigênio кислород syre ออกซิเจน oksijen khí Ôxy 氧气

ox·y·gen

n. oxígeno, elemento o gas incoloro e inodoro no metálico que circula libremente en la atmósfera;
___ deficiencyfalta de ___;
___ distributiondistribución de ___;
___ treatmenttratamiento de ___;
___ tanktanque portátil de ___.

oxygen

n oxígeno; home — oxígeno domiciliario, oxígeno en la casa; hyperbaric — oxígeno hiperbárico
References in periodicals archive ?
She has teamed with retired Goddard scientist Fred Herrero, who is pursuing the research in an emeritus capacity, to develop a miniaturized, low-mass, low-power, graphene-based detector that could measure the amount of atomic oxygen in the upper atmosphere.
The ability to release atomic oxygen makes ozone a powerful oxidizing agent, or giver of oxygen to other molecules.
Now, scientists from NASA are finding that atomic oxygen, which exists in Earth's upper atmosphere and chews away materials on orbiting satellites, may give conservators the tool they need to tackle this problem.
Atomic oxygen attacks the tissues of the lungs at the molecular level, disrupting chemical bonds.
One reason that satellites eventually fail is because atomic oxygen, a very aggressive gas found in space, degrades satellite components, such as support rods, panels and antennas," explains AECL Research scientist Chris Saunders.
The LDEF experiments gathered information on space radiation, atomic oxygen, meteoroids, space debris, space systems, and life sciences.
Expression Of Interest are invited for Atomic Oxygen ATOX Exposure Test Facility Establishment Design, Development, Fabrication and Testing of all Indian made satellites, As a sequel to its mandate of spacecraft realisation, the Centre is engaged in the development of cutting-edge technologies of relevance to its satellite building activities and setting up of infrastructure for Design, Development, Fabrication and Testing of Spacecraft,
Inside, a hot tungsten filament was heated to 1500 degrees Celsius, causing the oxygen molecules to dissociate into atomic oxygen.
The results indicate that as negative charges of the nano clusters increase, the molecular/ atomic oxygen adsorption models as well as the most stable adsorptive status vary.
Bruce Banks and Sharon Miller at the Electro-Physics Branch of NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, developed the Atomic Oxygen System for Art Restoration to restore paintings.
The most startling evidence, Frank says, comes from Polar's unexpected observation of bright ultraviolet emission from atomic oxygen in the trails, and from the detection of hydroxyl (OH) radicals produced by the breakup of water molecules exposed to sunlight.