ionizing radiation

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Related to Atomic radiation: ionizing radiation

i·on·iz·ing radiation

 (ī′ə-nī′zĭng)
n.
High-energy radiation capable of producing ionization in substances through which it passes. It includes nonparticulate radiation, such as x-rays, and radiation produced by energetic charged particles, such as alpha and beta rays, and by neutrons, as from a nuclear reaction.

ionizing radiation

n
(General Physics) electromagnetic or corpuscular radiation that is able to cause ionization

i′onizing radia′tion


n.
any radiation, as a stream of alpha particles or x-rays, that produces ionization as it passes through a medium.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ionizing radiation - high-energy radiation capable of producing ionization in substances through which it passes
alpha radiation, alpha ray - the radiation of alpha particles during radioactive decay
beta radiation, beta ray, electron radiation - radiation of beta particles during radioactive decay
cosmic ray - highly penetrating ionizing radiation of extraterrestrial origin; consisting chiefly of protons and alpha particles; collision with atmospheric particles results in rays and particles of many kinds
neutron radiation - radiation of neutrons (as by a neutron bomb)
radiation - energy that is radiated or transmitted in the form of rays or waves or particles
roentgen ray, X ray, X-radiation, X-ray - electromagnetic radiation of short wavelength produced when high-speed electrons strike a solid target
Translations
ionizující záření
ioniserende stråling

ion·iz·ing ra·di·a·tion

n. radiación por ionización.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fully illustrated 55-page guide is largely based on the findings of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), a subsidiary body of the United Nations General Assembly.
Vienna, Austria:United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation.
The Special Political and Decolonization Committee deals with a variety of subjects which include those related to decolonization, Palestinian refugees and human rights, peacekeeping, mine action, outer space, public information, atomic radiation and University for Peace.
UNSCEAR 2000 Sources and effects of Ionizing Radiation United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effect of Atomic Radiation Report to the General Assembly New York USA (2000).
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Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation claimed that the tests used by the Japanese government and Tokyo Electric Power Co.
Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation said in a summary report released on its website that the Japanese government and Tokyo Electric Power Co.
A number of international organizations confirm that for radiation induced cancer dose thresholds do exist - 200 mSv for bone marrow, 100 mSv for child thyroid, and 500 mSv for all other tissues and body parts (ICRP, 2005; United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, 2010).
The UN Scientific Committee on the Effect of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), meeting in Vienna, Austria, said the effects of radiation exposure on humans and the environment following the accident in March 2011 was discussed at the committee's annual session which started May 27.
A number of international organizations confirm that for radiation induced cancer dose thresholds do exist--200 mSv for bone marrow, 100 mSv for child thyroid, and 500 mSv for all other tissues and body parts (ICRP, 2005; United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, 2010).
More than 80 leading international scientists are putting their heads together for the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR).
According to the United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation report [1] the greatest contribution to mankind's exposure comes from natural background radiation.