ionizing radiation

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Related to Atomic radiation: ionizing radiation

i·on·iz·ing radiation

 (ī′ə-nī′zĭng)
n.
High-energy radiation capable of producing ionization in substances through which it passes. It includes nonparticulate radiation, such as x-rays, and radiation produced by energetic charged particles, such as alpha and beta rays, and by neutrons, as from a nuclear reaction.

ionizing radiation

n
(General Physics) electromagnetic or corpuscular radiation that is able to cause ionization

i′onizing radia′tion


n.
any radiation, as a stream of alpha particles or x-rays, that produces ionization as it passes through a medium.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ionizing radiation - high-energy radiation capable of producing ionization in substances through which it passes
alpha radiation, alpha ray - the radiation of alpha particles during radioactive decay
beta radiation, beta ray, electron radiation - radiation of beta particles during radioactive decay
cosmic ray - highly penetrating ionizing radiation of extraterrestrial origin; consisting chiefly of protons and alpha particles; collision with atmospheric particles results in rays and particles of many kinds
neutron radiation - radiation of neutrons (as by a neutron bomb)
radiation - energy that is radiated or transmitted in the form of rays or waves or particles
roentgen ray, X ray, X-radiation, X-ray - electromagnetic radiation of short wavelength produced when high-speed electrons strike a solid target
Translations
ionizující záření
ioniserende stråling

ion·iz·ing ra·di·a·tion

n. radiación por ionización.
References in periodicals archive ?
VIENNA, June 14 (KUNA) -- The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) discussed and approved two scientific reports on the evaluation of selected health effects and risks of exposure to radiation.
So almost 650 persons a day died from burn wounds and atomic radiation in both cities of Japan put together.
This approach has been repeatedly endorsed by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement (NCRP), and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) [3].
Further, the author applied the general formula to the data on dose versus cancer mortality risk published by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the effects of atomic radiation and other investigators to construct general formulas expressing a relationship between dose and solid cancer or leukemia mortality probability after exposure to acute low-dose ionizing radiation in humans on earth.
But from the ashes of the atomic wasteland rose the renewed Nagasaki University, which has developed into a world research centre on atomic radiation.
According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) (1,2), so far there have been 80 different radiological accidents involving 120 radiation workers, 110 members of the public and 12 deaths.
UNSCEAR 2000 Sources and effects of Ionizing Radiation United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effect of Atomic Radiation Report to the General Assembly New York USA (2000).
However, there would be no measurable rise of cancer in the Japanese population overall, the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) said in its final report on the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
[13] Sources and Effects of Ionizing Radiation, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, 1993.
Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation claimed that the tests used by the Japanese government and Tokyo Electric Power Co.
Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation said in a summary report released on its website that the Japanese government and Tokyo Electric Power Co., known as TEPCO, may have underestimated radiation doses of the workers as tests used failed to take into account some types of radiation.