nuclear warfare

(redirected from Atomic war)
Related to Atomic war: Nuclear warfare, Nuclear attack

nuclear warfare

Warfare involving the employment of nuclear weapons. See also postattack period; transattack period.
References in periodicals archive ?
The idea that such a facility, built in a time of great world tensions and hidden from the public, tells the story of the Cold War in such an artistic way, is fascinating in itself, and it is unique in the world, said Special Adviser to the United Nations (UN) Secretary-General Adama Dieng, after visiting the D-0 ARK Underground Collection, located in the Atomic War Command near Konjic.
And Pakistani troops are giving matching response to Indian unprovoked firing and are well-prepared for an atomic war, as threatened by Indian Army Chief Gen Bipin Rawat on January 14, this year.
The expression is commonly used to mean "ready to launch an atomic war," but the writer added in "Safire's Political Dictionary" that it is also a "scare phrase used in attacking candidates" during presidential elections.
The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) was awarded this year's NobelPeace Prize by a Nobelcommittee that cited the spread of nuclear weapons and the growing risk of an atomic war.
Hence Tehreek-i-Kashmir has appealed all the peace loving countries of world particularly USA, China, France, Great Britain, OIC and other nations to take serious note of the situation and save South Asian Sub-continent and the world from horrors of atomic war.
The nuclear threat is the threat on the Russian border," he said, adding later on that "both sides are acting as if an atomic war is thinkable.
Sixty years ago, the specter of atomic war also seemed all too real.
Readers remembered my two columns on World War III hot spots (5/31/15 and 6/7/15) and asked about the possible aftermath of an atomic war.
Both Pakistan and India carry atomic weapons and any further imbalance will put these countries on the verge of an atomic war.
This act cascaded into a major diplomatic crisis, the Berlin Airlift, and increased worries over a potential atomic war.
Atomic war fears were represented in comics (including Bradbury's classic 'There Will Come Soft Rains', about an all-automated house which continues its functions after humans are dead from atomic warfare), military forces began to achieve representation in the comic world, and the conversion of MAD to a comic format gained new enthusiasts.
But to openly wage atomic war would be folly, leaving you vulnerable to swift and severe retaliation.