Hawthorne effect

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Hawthorne effect

(ˈhɔːˌθɔːn)
n
(Sociology) improvement in the performance of employees, students, etc, brought about by making changes in working methods, resulting from research into means of improving performance. Compare iatrogenic, placebo effect
[from the Western Electric Company's Hawthorne works in Chicago, USA, where it was discovered during experiments in the 1920s]
References in periodicals archive ?
One of these techniques, called attention bias modification or ABM, specifically targets this pattern of bias.
Yair Bar-Haim of Tel Aviv University's School of Psychological Sciences and his fellow researchers are pursuing the treatment that uses a technique called Attention Bias Modification (ABM) to reduce anxiety by drawing children away from their tendency to dwell on potential threats, ultimately changing their thought patterns.
The Creighton University study is the first trial in the United States, and one of only two trials in the world, testing the effectiveness of Attention Bias Modification Therapy (ABMT) for PTSD.