ADH

(redirected from Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia)
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ADH

abbr.
antidiuretic hormone

ADH

abbreviation for
(Biochemistry) antidiuretic hormone. See vasopressin

ADH

antidiuretic hormone. Compare vasopressin.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ADH - hormone secreted by the posterior pituitary gland (trade name Pitressin) and also by nerve endings in the hypothalamusADH - hormone secreted by the posterior pituitary gland (trade name Pitressin) and also by nerve endings in the hypothalamus; affects blood pressure by stimulating capillary muscles and reduces urine flow by affecting reabsorption of water by kidney tubules
pressor, vasoconstrictive, vasoconstrictor - any agent that causes a narrowing of an opening of a blood vessel: cold or stress or nicotine or epinephrine or norepinephrine or angiotensin or vasopressin or certain drugs; maintains or increases blood pressure
endocrine, hormone, internal secretion - the secretion of an endocrine gland that is transmitted by the blood to the tissue on which it has a specific effect
References in periodicals archive ?
(3.) Menes TS, Kerlikowske K, Lange J, Jaffer S, Rosenberg R, Miglioretti DL, Subsequent breast cancer risk following diagnosis of atypical ductal hyperplasia on needle biopsy.
Gestational exposure BPA exposure ([mu]g/kg BW/day) Incidence [n (%)] Diagnosis 0 0/5 (0) NA 0.25 3/5(60) ADH 2.5 1/5 (20) ADH 25 0/5 (0) NA 250 2/5 (40) ADH Gestational/lactational exposure BPA exposure ([mu]g/kg BW/day) Incidence [n (%)] Diagnosis 0 0/5(0) NA 0.25 0/5 (0) NA 2.5 1/5 (20) ADH 25 1/5 (20) DCIS, ADH 250 1/6 (17) ADH Abbreviations: ADH, atypical ductal hyperplasia; DCIS, ductal carcinoma in situ; NA, not applicable (no lesion detected for diagnosis).
All patients with atypical ductal hyperplasia and DCIS were referred to a breast surgeon or oncologist.
Rates of atypical ductal hyperplasia declined with less use of postmenopausal hormone treatment: findings from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium.
Atypical ductal hyperplasia: interobserver and intraobserver variation.
Previous studies have shown that women who are diagnosed with atypical ductal hyperplasia are at a three- to five-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer.
The women were at high risk because of a personal history of breast cancer (53%), familial high risk by Gail or Claus models (42%), prior atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia, lobular carcinoma in situ, or atypical papilloma (3%), BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations (1%), or prior mediastinal/chest radiation therapy (1%).
The women were at high risk because of a personal history of breast cancer (53%), familial high risk by Gaff or Claus models (42%), prior atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia, lobular carcinoma in situ, or atypical papilloma (3%), BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations (1%), or prior mediastinal / chest radiation therapy (1%).
Only about 60% of the breast cancers that develop in women with either atypical lobular hyperplasia or atypical ductal hyperplasia occur in the ipsilateral breast.
Atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) includes a group of lesions defined by cytologic and architectural features that resemble, but fall short, either quantitatively or qualitatively, of a diagnosis of low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ.
(1,3) Papillomas may demonstrate a spectrum of atypical features that include atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) or low-grade DCIS.
A comprehensive panel of antibodies for breast carcinoma includes ADH-5 (atypical ductal hyperplasia).

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