Auger effect

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Auger effect

(ˈaʊɡə)
n
(Atomic Physics) the spontaneous emission of an electron instead of a photon by an excited ion as a result of a vacancy being filled in an inner electron shell
[C20: named after Pierre Auger (1899–1993), French physicist]
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References in periodicals archive ?
The low energies of Auger electrons restrict their penetration to few mono-layers or about 10 A below the surface.
However, the energy shift observed in the Auger electrons in Figure 2(a) hides details that are revealed by the second derivative method, as shown in Figure 3, adopting the method described in [6] but using the Savitzky-Golay smoothing procedure.
[sup.111]In can be also utilized as therapeutic nucleotide as emitter of auger electrons [40].
In this manner, the emitted Auger electrons from the 6s orbital should appear with four different kinetic energies, which are listed in Table 1 [13].
The process for generating Auger electrons begins with an electron beam transferring energy to an atom in the solid causing an electron to be ejected from a core energy level (1), (2) (see the schematic diagram in Figure 1).
In Auger Spectroscopy, a beam of electrons is used to excite low energy electrons, called Auger electrons, which are emitted from the surface.
As a result, inelastic scattering generates numerous energy transfers in the form of secondary electrons, Auger electrons, continuum and characteristic X-rays, several forms of electromagnetic radiation and lattice vibrations (heat) as well.
Controversy was in evidence at this year's conference, too, as attendees in standing-room-only sessions heard contrasting views on the interaction of atoms and Auger electrons.
Since atoms of particular elements eject electrons at characteristic energies, measuring the energies of the fleeing Auger electrons identifies the parent atoms.
AES focuses a narrow beam of electrons onto a conducting sample, and measures the energy of near surface Auger electrons that are emitted.
These depth profiles consist of composition information at the typical escape depth of the Auger electrons (25 A) and the typical escape depth of x rays in EDX (1 [Mu]).