Lumière

(redirected from Auguste and Louis Lumiere)

Lu·mière

 (lo͝o-myĕr′, lü-), Auguste Marie Louis Nicolas 1862-1954.
French chemist, inventor, and cinematography pioneer. With his brother Louis Jean Lumière (1864-1948) he gave the first public showing of a cinematic film (1895).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Lumière

(French lymjɛr)
n
(Biography) Auguste Marie Louis Nicolas (oɡyst mari lwi nikɔlɑ). 1862–1954, and his brother, Louis Jean (lwi ʒɑ̃), 1864–1948, French chemists and cinema pioneers, who invented a cinematograph and a process of colour photography
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
1895: The first celluloid film was presented to an invited audience by Auguste and Louis Lumiere in Paris.
One of the more resilient myths of cinema history holds that at a screening of Auguste and Louis Lumiere's 1896 film L'arrivee d'uti train en gare de La Ciotat (Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat Station), the fifty-second reel of a locomotive engine pulling into the station incited a stampede out of the theater by audience members unfamiliar with moving images.
French brothers Auguste and Louis Lumiere first demonstrated a projector system in Paris in 1895 and screened the first public film in 1907.
Perhaps Lyon's greatest claim to fame is as the home of Auguste and Louis Lumiere, the inventors of the cinema.
The brothers Auguste and Louis Lumiere were in business - and they weren't alone.
Jones's second work for Lyon Opera Ballet pays homage to Auguste and Louis Lumiere, the Lyons-born brothers who perfected the form that we know today as film.
Acknowledging the importance of Auguste and Louis Lumiere to the history of cinema, Siegfried Kracauer, in his Theory of Film (1960), divided the filmmaking impulse--and, in effect, film history--into two main tendencies.
1895 - The first celluloid film was presented to an invited audience by Auguste and Louis Lumiere in Paris.
1888 - The English Football League was formed by 12 clubs meeting at a Fleet Street hotel1895 - The first celluloid film was presented publicly on a screen by Auguste and Louis Lumiere in Paris.
LIVERPOOL has been a haven for film-makers since it all began - from the recent Alfie remake starring Jude Law all the way back to 1895 and Liverpool Scenes filmed by the fathers of modern cinematography, the brothers Auguste and Louis Lumiere.