Augustine

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Au·gus·tine 1

 (ô′gə-stēn′, ô-gŭs′tĭn), Saint ad 354-430.
Early Christian church father and philosopher who served (396-430) as the bishop of Hippo (in present-day Algeria). Through such writings as the autobiographical Confessions (397) and the voluminous City of God (413-426), he profoundly influenced Christianity, arguing against Manichaeism and Donatism and helping to establish the doctrine of original sin.

Au·gus·tine 2

 (ô′gə-stēn′, ô-gŭs′tĭn) also Aus·tin (ô′stən), Saint Known as "Apostle of the English." Died c. 604.
Italian-born missionary and prelate who introduced Christianity to southern Britain and in 597 was ordained as the first archbishop of Canterbury.

Augustine

(ɔːˈɡʌstɪn)
n
1. (Biography) Saint. 354–430 ad, one of the Fathers of the Christian Church; bishop of Hippo in North Africa (396–430), who profoundly influenced both Catholic and Protestant theology. His most famous works are Confessions, a spiritual autobiography, and De Civitate Dei, a vindication of the Christian Church. Feast day: Aug 28
2. (Biography) Saint. died 604 ad, Roman monk, sent to Britain (597 ad) to convert the Anglo-Saxons to Christianity and to establish the authority of the Roman See over the native Celtic Church; became the first archbishop of Canterbury (601–604). Feast day: May 26 or 27
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a member of an Augustinian order

Au•gus•tine

(ˈɔ gəˌstin, ɔˈgʌs tɪn, əˈgʌs-)

n.
1. Saint, A.D. 354–430, one of the Latin fathers in the early Christian Church; bishop of Hippo in N Africa.
2. Saint, (Austin) died A.D. 604, Roman monk: headed group of missionaries who landed in England A.D. 597; first archbishop of Canterbury 601–604.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Augustine - (Roman Catholic Church) one of the great Fathers of the early Christian churchAugustine - (Roman Catholic Church) one of the great Fathers of the early Christian church; after a dramatic conversion to Christianity he became bishop of Hippo Regius in North Africa; St. Augustine emphasized man's need for grace (354-430)
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
Translations
Augustýn
Augustin

Augustine

[ɔːˈgʌstɪn] NAgustín

Augustine

nAugustinus m
References in classic literature ?
The name of Don Augustin de Certavallos was scarcely known beyond the limits of the little town in which he resided, though he found a secret pleasure himself in pointing it out, in large scrolls of musty documents, to an only child, as enrolled among the former heroes and grandees of Old and of New Spain.
The haughty and reserved Don Augustin was by far too observant of the forms of that station, on which he so much valued himself, to forget the duties of a gentleman.
In the mean time, it became necessary to report to Don Augustin, the effects his arguments and prayers had produced on the heretical disposition of the young soldier.
Don Augustin himself was now seized with the desire of proselyting.
Middleton was returning through the grounds of Don Augustin, from a visit of duty to his encampment, at that hour in which the light of the sun begins to melt into the shadows of evening, when a glimpse of a robe, similar to that in which Inez had accompanied him to the altar, caught his eye through the foliage of a retired arbour.
It is getting late, my Inez," he said, "and Don Augustin would be apt to reproach you with inattention to your health, in being abroad at such an hour.
I doubt not that I should be all you can wish, were I to become as good as the worthy and respectable Don Augustin.
Don Augustin received him with warmth, and for many minutes his mind was amused by relating to his new kinsman plans for the future.
Don Augustin had all the feelings of a father, but they were smothered in the lassitude of a Creole.
Furnished with these facts, Middleton detailed a small guard of his most trusty men, took leave of Don Augustin, without declaring his hopes or his fears, and having arrived at the indicated point, he pushed into the wilderness in pursuit.
Yes," replied the priest; "'tis Augustin Nypho who writes it, that Italian doctor who had a bearded demon who acquainted him with all things.
Ye are friends and allies of our reverend father in God, Aymer, Prior of Jorvaulx,'' said the monk, without noticing the tone of De Bracy's reply; ``ye owe him aid both by knightly faith and holy charity; for what saith the blessed Saint Augustin, in his treatise De Civitate Dei ''