Augustine


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Au·gus·tine 1

 (ô′gə-stēn′, ô-gŭs′tĭn), Saint ad 354-430.
Early Christian church father and philosopher who served (396-430) as the bishop of Hippo (in present-day Algeria). Through such writings as the autobiographical Confessions (397) and the voluminous City of God (413-426), he profoundly influenced Christianity, arguing against Manichaeism and Donatism and helping to establish the doctrine of original sin.

Au·gus·tine 2

 (ô′gə-stēn′, ô-gŭs′tĭn) also Aus·tin (ô′stən), Saint Known as "Apostle of the English." Died c. 604.
Italian-born missionary and prelate who introduced Christianity to southern Britain and in 597 was ordained as the first archbishop of Canterbury.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Augustine

(ɔːˈɡʌstɪn)
n
1. (Biography) Saint. 354–430 ad, one of the Fathers of the Christian Church; bishop of Hippo in North Africa (396–430), who profoundly influenced both Catholic and Protestant theology. His most famous works are Confessions, a spiritual autobiography, and De Civitate Dei, a vindication of the Christian Church. Feast day: Aug 28
2. (Biography) Saint. died 604 ad, Roman monk, sent to Britain (597 ad) to convert the Anglo-Saxons to Christianity and to establish the authority of the Roman See over the native Celtic Church; became the first archbishop of Canterbury (601–604). Feast day: May 26 or 27
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a member of an Augustinian order
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Au•gus•tine

(ˈɔ gəˌstin, ɔˈgʌs tɪn, əˈgʌs-)

n.
1. Saint, A.D. 354–430, one of the Latin fathers in the early Christian Church; bishop of Hippo in N Africa.
2. Saint, (Austin) died A.D. 604, Roman monk: headed group of missionaries who landed in England A.D. 597; first archbishop of Canterbury 601–604.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Augustine - (Roman Catholic Church) one of the great Fathers of the early Christian churchAugustine - (Roman Catholic Church) one of the great Fathers of the early Christian church; after a dramatic conversion to Christianity he became bishop of Hippo Regius in North Africa; St. Augustine emphasized man's need for grace (354-430)
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Augustýn
Augustin

Augustine

[ɔːˈgʌstɪn] NAgustín
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Augustine

nAugustinus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
And thus ended the whole romance and ideal of life for Augustine St.
There is a most busy and important round of eating, drinking, dressing, walking, visiting, buying, selling, talking, reading, and all that makes up what is commonly called living, yet to be gone through; and this yet remained to Augustine. Had his wife been a whole woman, she might yet have done something--as woman can--to mend the broken threads of life, and weave again into a tissue of brightness.
Augustine's City of God, of the Utopia of Sir Thomas More, and of the numerous other imaginary States which are framed upon the same model.
They had gone rather more than a league and had begun to descry the first houses of the village, the red-tiled roofs of which stood out from the green trees which surrounded them, when, coming toward them mounted on a mule, they perceived a poor monk, whose large hat and gray worsted dress made them take him for an Augustine brother.
Augustine, where, out of regard for the supposed susceptibility of Mr.
Now the Princess happened to walk that way; and when she heard the tune, she stood quite still, and seemed pleased; for she could play "Lieber Augustine"; it was the only piece she knew; and she played it with one finger.
Augustine, to be expended for the benefit of the poor, and for the conversion of the Indians to the Catholic faith: but that, if I appeared, or any one for me, to claim the inheritance, it would be restored; only that the improvement, or annual production, being distributed to charitable uses, could not be restored: but he assured me that the steward of the king's revenue from lands, and the providore, or steward of the monastery, had taken great care all along that the incumbent, that is to say my partner, gave every year a faithful account of the produce, of which they had duly received my moiety.
Augustine, a hundred and fifty miles to the south, was inaudible two miles to the north in a still atmosphere.
Augustine. Then comes your uncle's place--Lesser Hill.
She--and how many more--might have ironically said to God with Saint Augustine: "Thou hast counselled a better course than Thou hast permitted."
Monica, mother of the holy Augustine, he was heard by brother Ambrose and others to say that he wished twenty thousand devils would fly away with the said Monica, mother of the holy Augustine, or any other saint who came between a man and his meat.
It traced its origin to an abbey school, founded before the Conquest, where the rudiments of learning were taught by Augustine monks; and, like many another establishment of this sort, on the destruction of the monasteries it had been reorganised by the officers of King Henry VIII and thus acquired its name.