Aulis


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Au·lis

 (ô′lĭs)
An ancient port of east-central Greece in Boeotia. According to tradition, it was the embarkation point for the Greek fleet during the Trojan War.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Aulis

(ˈɔːlɪs)
n
(Placename) an ancient town in E central Greece, in Boeotia: traditionally the harbour from which the Greeks sailed at the beginning of the Trojan war
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
As an example of motiveless degradation of character, we have Menelaus in the Orestes: of character indecorous and inappropriate, the lament of Odysseus in the Scylla, and the speech of Melanippe: of inconsistency, the Iphigenia at Aulis,--for Iphigenia the suppliant in no way resembles her later self.
"All who have not since perished must remember as though it were yesterday or the day before, how the ships of the Achaeans were detained in Aulis when we were on our way hither to make war on Priam and the Trojans.
These were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis, and who held Schoenus, Scolus, and the highlands of Eteonus, with Thespeia, Graia, and the fair city of Mycalessus.
646-662) If ever you turn your misguided heart to trading and with to escape from debt and joyless hunger, I will show you the measures of the loud-roaring sea, though I have no skill in sea-faring nor in ships; for never yet have I sailed by ship over the wide sea, but only to Euboea from Aulis where the Achaeans once stayed through much storm when they had gathered a great host from divine Hellas for Troy, the land of fair women.
It was while sacrificing a bullock to the spirit of Agamemnon that Laiaides, a priest of Aulis, was favored with an audience of that illustrious warrior's shade, who prophetically recounted to him the birth of Christ and the triumph of Christianity, giving him also a rapid but tolerably complete review of events down to the reign of Saint Louis.
Yannis Kalavrianos directs NTNG's summer production, Iphigenia in Aulis by Euripides, in a new translation by Pantelis Boukalas and with Anthi Efstratiadou, the 2016 recipient of the Melina Mercouri theatre award, in the role of Iphigenia.
In stark contrast to such a tradition, Euripides offers a radically different version of the Clytemnestra myth in his Electra and, more particularly, in Iphigenia at Aulis. Both plays justify the Queen's moral conduct, make her a just avenger, endow her with an extraordinary strength of character, and place the blame for the beginning of the whole tragic cycle on Agamemnon.
There was, essentially, an early modern Greek tragic canon which largely neglected Oedipus, and instead concentrated on Euripides's Hecuba, Iphigenia in Aulis, Medea, and Alcestis (Hecuba and Iphigenia in Aulis came to popularity in Erasmus's Latin translations, first printed in 1506, while Medea and Alcestis appeared in the translations of George Buchanan in the 1540s).
COLM TOIBIN'S MOST recent book, House of Names, is a novelistic version of the ancient Greek story told principally in the Oresteia of Aeschylus, Sophocles' Electra, and Euripides' Electra, Orestes, and Iphigenia in Aulis. But oddly, Toibin's version never mentions Argos and never refers specifically to any Greek god.
The self-assured hubris of a man who likes to play God for a living is challenged when he has to make an innocent pay for his crimes - the central conflict of Greek auteur Yorgos Lanthimos' ( Dogtooth, The Lobster ) chilling film, Killing of a Sacred Deer , is a metaphorical allegory borrowed from the Greek play Iphigenia in Aulis.