Australian ballot


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Australian ballot

n.
A printed ballot that bears the names of all candidates and the texts of propositions and is distributed to the voter at the polls and marked in secret. Also called secret ballot.

Austral′ian bal′lot


n.
a ballot containing the names of all the candidates for public office, handed to a voter at a polling place to be marked in secret: it originated in Australia.
[1885–90, Amer.]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Some of these--such as the Australian ballot (or government printed ballot cast in secret by the voter)--were sensible, long overdue, and good for the parties in that they increased public confidence in American democracy.
(18) Part II.A examines the history and evolution of the secret vote and Australian ballot system.
(7) This can be seen in the extensive debates over Women's Suffrage, the role of the 1885 Constitution in the 1889 Constitution, the Preamble, and the Australian Ballot. (8)
Other voting regulations followed the Australian Ballot, including new registration laws, literacy tests, and other restrictions.
The secret ballot is sometimes called internationally the 'Australian ballot'.
He specifies the various reforms that have shaped and broadened our voting system including the adoption of a single day to vote for President and for members of Congress the use of the "Australian ballot" the abolition of property ownership tests and the extension of the right to vote to African Americans and women.
The secret ballot, or what continues to be known across America as the Australian Ballot, was most strongly and successfully promoted by the Progressives since it was crucial to this movement's major democratic ideal, namely Initiative and Referendum.
(68) Mark McKenna, 'Building "a closet of prayer" in the new world: The story of the 'Australian ballot', in Sawer (ed.), Elections, p.
The first secret ballot, widely known for some 100 years as the 'Australian ballot; took place in South Australia in 1858.
--John Wigmore, The Australian Ballot System as Embodied in the
(1) Drawing upon institutional and public-choice arguments, we highlight the relevance of nationwide and state-specific demographic, economic, structural, and political factors--for example, growth in patronage constituencies; the use of the Australian ballot; political party competition; dwindling patronage resources post-Pendleton; and the onset of the Great Depression--in the shift of politicians' preferences from patronage to the merit system.
Since the introduction of the Australian ballot in the 1880s, virtually all voting is conducted secretly.

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