Australian pine


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Australian pine

n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Australian pine - common Australian tree widely grown as an ornamental in tropical regions; yields heavy hard red wood
genus Casuarina - genus of trees and shrubs widely naturalized in southern United States and West Indies; coextensive with the family Casuarinaceae and order Casuarinales
beefwood - any of several Australian trees of the genus Casuarina yielding heavy hard red wood used in cabinetwork
References in periodicals archive ?
Different areas of the Keys have different species of concern but Brazilian pepper, Australian pine, Asiatic colubrina, lead tree, seaside mahoe, non-native scaevola and bowstring hemp are the most abundant.
Hurricane Charley took care of that problem a few years back by uprooting just about all of them during a furious two-hour assault on the island that even the most avid Australian Pine haters acknowledged was much to high a price to pay to get rid of some trees.
Everglades National Park spends about $1 million annually on exotic-plant management, which includes efforts to eradicate Brazilian peppers, Australian pine trees, and the Old World Climbing Fern.
Speaking from an Australian pine forest Ruth, 44, said: "Knowing we've beaten the world record feels pretty good.
Speaking from the middle of an Australian pine forest, Ruth, 44, said: "Knowing we've beaten the world record feels pretty good.
Known for its rapid growth, dense coverage, and thick litter accumulation, Australian pine inhibits growth of native plants.
Why not fuss over a towering Australian Pine that is likely to come crashing down on an insured's home in a strong wind?
1 -- 2) Pierce College biology professors Pat Farris, left, and Kate Kubach carry a rare Australian pine tree to be planted in the botanical gardens at the college on Friday.
Especially artistic is an Australian pine grouping designed by John Naka, considered America's No.
I'm the king of devastation," he jokes, standing next to the shattered red stump of a recently pulverized Australian pine.
This enhancement involved removing exotic woody vegetation such as Brazilian Pepper and Australian Pine, which crowds out the mangroves and other desirable species that maintain the habitat.
The once-rounded forest canopies that covered the Bahamas in pre-Columbian times are today serrated with the graceful spires of the aromatic Australian pine, or Casuarina, a species introduced much later.

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