Australianism


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Australianism

(ɒˈstreɪlɪəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. the Australian national character or spirit
2. loyalty to Australia, its political independence, culture, etc
3. a linguistic usage, custom, or other feature peculiar to or characteristic of Australia, its people, or their culture

Aus•tral•ian•ism

(ɔˈstreɪl yəˌnɪz əm)
n.
a language feature characteristic of or peculiar to Australian English.
[1890–1900]
References in periodicals archive ?
WALT: In the armed services mateship was a peculiar Australianism.
People in Wales - and Britain - will more probably greet a passing acquaintance with a cheery "Bore braf/Fine morning" - or morose "Mae'n oer/It's cold" rather than "How are you?" or that pervasive Australianism "Have a good day!" This year we have no grounds for complaint.
"The research findings have shown that Macca's is Australia's favourite brand nickname and that half of the population use the iconic Australianism," said McDonald's Australia's chief marketing officer Mark Lollback.
We had seen for ourselves where some of the roots of our 'Australianism' were born, the place from which we draw a lingering pride from a time long gone when people - some might now say foolishly - went forth to do what they took to be their duty.
(2001), 'The "Long-term or Permanent Casual" - An Oxymoron or "a Welt Enough Understood Australianism" in the Law?', Australian Bulletin of Labour, vol.
(52) Susan Gardner, "'A 'vert to Australianism": Beatrice Grimshaw and the Bicentenary', Hecate, 12, (1987), p.
The fact remains, however, that we are still vague about which values, beliefs, attitudes, mores and folkways constitute the core of "Australianism".
For example, Atherton speaks of the meaning behind the words of the pseudonym: Geyer, pronounced guy-er, is the Americanism for a man and an Australianism for a joke and thus links the pseudonyms of Lehmann and Geyer, through the Bulletin hoax.
"Look," he says, using the Australianism that prefixes nearly every sentence uttered by, just for example, Shane Warne, "Bart Cummings has won more Group 1s than I have and 11 Melbourne Cups.
A Sydney-based and highly influential magazine that remained at the forefront of Australian life from 1880-1961, the Bulletin baldly promoted egalitarianism, unionism, and Australianism. Soon after its inception, the publication "quickly became known as the 'bushman's bible' as much for the aggressive Australian tone of its writing as for its concentration on rural issues ...
Howard's strategy was to claim a return to the stability or simplicity of the 1950s, offering the dream of revived suburban security in the face of heightening insecurity both globally and domestically, and to insert the appeal of One Nation into his own project, with monoculturalism, a kind of revived old Australianism, replacing the more strident anti-Asian racism of One Nation.
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