Austria-Hungary

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Aus·tri·a-Hun·ga·ry

 (ô′strē-ə-hŭng′gə-rē)
A former dual monarchy of central Europe consisting of Austria, Hungary, Bohemia, Moravia, Slovakia, Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia, Herzegovina, and parts of Poland, Ukraine, Romania, Serbia, and Italy. It was formed in 1867 after agitation by Hungarian nationalists within the Austrian empire and lasted until 1918.

Aus′tro-Hun·gar′i·an (ô′strō-hŭng-gâr′ē-ən) adj. & n.

Austria-Hungary

n
1. (Historical Terms) the Dual Monarchy established in 1867, consisting of what are now Austria, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, and Bosnia-Herzegovina, and parts of Poland, Romania, Ukraine, and Italy. The empire was broken up after World War I
2. (Placename) the Dual Monarchy established in 1867, consisting of what are now Austria, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, and Bosnia-Herzegovina, and parts of Poland, Romania, Ukraine, and Italy. The empire was broken up after World War I

Aus′tria-Hun′gary



n.
a former monarchy (1867–1918) in central Europe that included what is now Austria, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and parts of Romania, Poland, Yugoslavia, and Italy.
Aus′tro-Hungar′ian (ˌɔ stroʊ) adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Austria-Hungary - a geographical area in central and eastern EuropeAustria-Hungary - a geographical area in central and eastern Europe; broken into separate countries at the end of World War I
Europe - the 2nd smallest continent (actually a vast peninsula of Eurasia); the British use `Europe' to refer to all of the continent except the British Isles
Translations

Austria-Hungary

References in periodicals archive ?
It should not be forgotten that, although the alliance of Romania with Austro-Hungary was a secret one, the closeness to Germany and Austro-Hungary was a quite visible one, and the Tsarist Russia was trying to attract Romania on its side, using a variety of means (there had been tried the marriage of prince Carol (a king after 1881) with a Russian princess, and there was a partial success in the case of the prince heir Ferdinand, married with the British-Russian princess Maria de Edinburgh n.n.)
This was an act meant to convince Austro-Hungary to give Croatia to Serbia, which was developing into the Yugoslav kingdom.Austro-Hungary was backed by Germany as it tried to extract revenge from Serbia.
However, the involvement of Austro-Hungary meant that Germany was involved, and because Austro-Hungary was in conflict with Serbia, Russia and then France got involved.
The historyThe vain efforts of Czechs and Slovaks for equal status within the Habsburg Monarchy resulted in their decision to leave Austro-Hungary. Czechoslovakia was created on October 28, 1918.During the creation of the new republic, there were disputes as to which state then Pressburg should belong to ndash Czechoslovakia, Hungary or Austria.
The Bolsheviks had seized control in Russia, the Austro-Hungary empire had been dismembered.
Given the country's vastness and the borders all around, the influences have been massive, from the Far East along through Persia towards the Levant, and upwards through Austro-Hungary and along the Baltic coast.
The assassination of the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne Archduke Franz Ferdinand had sparked World War One and Austro-Hungary was an ally of Germany in the conflict.
While rival European empires such as the Hapsburgs' Austro-Hungary and Weber's native Germany (https://books.google.com/books?id=jGboBAAAQBAJ&pg=PT233&dq=Hapsburg+Kaiser+Wilhelm+Bureaucracy&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwig04Pc6IDRAhUESSYKHdM3D1kQ6AEIUzAI#v=onepage&q=Hapsburg%20Kaiser%20Wilhelm%20Bureaucracy&f=false) were rising in the 19th century as they developed impressive civil and military bureaucracies and procedures, the Ottoman Empire was declining.
Sitting in one it is easy to recall when Budapest was the second city of the Austro-Hungary Empire, when its cafes catered to people such as Franz Listz who made famous Hungarian folk music.
This Service ultimately was required to fly against the combined forces of Germany, Austro-Hungary, and the Ottoman Empires during the Great War.
On 9 February 1918, the UNR and the Central Powers of Germany, Austro-Hungary, Bulgaria and Turkey signed the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk, which had a significant bearing on the events that followed.
The third chapter, "Neutrality and Propaganda," deals mostly with the effects of the film in the "neutral" areas of Europe, mainly Austro-Hungary and the Ottoman empire; the "neutrality" of the countries speaking Germanic languages (Holland, Scandinavia, and Switzerland) was already questionable.