Authorly

Au´thor`ly


a.1.Authorial.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fictional footnote is typically conflated with authorly ambition rather than readerly enjoyment; it's the rare reader who appreciates the likes of Pale Fire (Vladimir Nabokov, 1962) or Infinite Jest (David Foster Wallace, 1996) for the number and density of its notes.
@LYNNEBARRETTLEE www.lynnebarrett-lee.com *These are, of course, all the spiky, straightline ones, most amenable to an authorly flourish
You would think that someone who works for a newspaper would be able to distinguish fact from fancy, to feel some sense of authorly responsibility for getting the story correct, to have a nose for propaganda.
Still, a trusting acceptance of these first-hand accounts, combined with authorly enthusiasm for the subject, leads to some naive claims.
The work includes vignettes on the techniques of fiction writing, impish in its rundown to the reader of authorly ploys such as point of view, withholding information, or use of present tense.
As cognitive poetics processes literary reading with both psychological and linguistic dimensions, it "offers a means of discussing interpretation whether it is an authorly version of the world or a readerly account, and how those interpretations are made manifest in textuality" (Stockwell 5).
And if seeing your book in hardcover on the shelf at Barnes & Noble is the culmination of all your authorly dreams, then you're going to have to keep slogging away at sending your manuscript off to agents only to be rejected ...
With words that truly illustrate the correlation of fact and fiction, the uneasy wavering of boundary lines that seek to hold their form between the two, Muller develops his theory of Woolf's authorly shortcomings by use of natural metaphor:
The first time I heard one sound I reached for my coat and prepared to exit in an authorly manner (saving my books).
The chapter begins with the contention that Jonson's authorial ego should be understood as emerging in relation to other authorly self-representations, particularly Field's.
To these are added derivatives from human nouns authorly beastly brotherly cowardly fatherly gentlemanly granddaughterly housekeeperly husbandly kingly landlordly manly marksmanly matronly miserly motherly neighborly queenly saintly scholarly wifely womanly, etc.