stylometry

(redirected from Authorship analysis)

stylometry

(staɪˈlɒmətrɪ)
n
the study of the style of something such as a written text so as to determine the author
References in periodicals archive ?
A Case Study in Forensic Stylometry: How Authorship Analysis Revealed Who Penned The Cuckoo's Calling (59)
The International Association of Forensic Linguists ("IAFL") serves as the disciplinary home for trained linguists operating in a variety of forensic contexts, including authorship analysis. (78) The group's choice to embrace validation testing and training is a clear indication that--despite the historical disciplinary divide between forensic stylistic analysts and computational analysts--practitioners in the field believe a touchstone for the reliability of forensic linguistic evidence is both necessary and desirable.
As a result, in addition to saying that authorship analysis methods are more accurate and reliable today than they were a decade ago, we can specify what kinds of techniques are best for particular problems and quantify both the accuracy rates and the improvement in their accuracy rates.
A further strength of forensic authorship analysis is the existence of several well-curated collections of natural language that provide a baseline for quantitative assertions about linguistic features in texts.
Research in authorship analysis dates back to 19th century itself on 'The Federalist Papers' (a series of 146 political essays written by John Jay, Alexander Hamilton, and James Madison, twelve of which claimed by both Hamilton and Madison) was definitely the most influential work in authorship attribution.
Applying authorship analysis to extremist-group web forum messages.
He describes the context and background of cyber crime, with a focus on software piracy and copyright infringement; litigation; formal elements and measures in software and their forensic importance; judicial expectations and recommendations on the investigation of software copyright infringement; authorship analysis; the procedures of the AFT (abstraction-filtration-comparison) and POSAR (planning-operationalization-separation-analysis-reporting) tests; and additional factors for inclusion in software copyright infringement forensics, such as cyclicality, post-piracy modifications, and programming blunders.
It also involves training that will help the researcher build on her existing experience as a court certified interpreter and a forensic linguist expert in authorship analysis. The fellowship will help the researcher establish herself as an expert on linguistic aspects of pro se litigation and help her reinforce her expertise in authorship analysis, forensic text analysis, trainer of police forces and future interpreters.
Authorship analysis techniques can then reveal what messages come from the same individual.
John Hilton, Noel Reynolds, and Arlene Saxonhouse have employed statistical authorship analysis to claim that Hobbes authored three anonymously published works.
But the recent attribution of three discourses to Hobbes claims to rest on a new, more substantial method of proof -- statistical authorship analysis. The increase in computer processing power permitted a comparison of the writing style of Hobbes's known works and the works of the Horae.
To cut through the confusion arising from the overlapping personal histories and writings of the three most significant candidates for authorship of the Horae, Hilton, Reynolds, and Saxonhouse employ the latest techniques of statistical authorship analysis to show that three of the discourses are written in a style indistinguishable from the style of Hobbes in his known works.