stylometry

(redirected from Authorship analysis)

stylometry

(staɪˈlɒmətrɪ)
n
the study of the style of something such as a written text so as to determine the author
References in periodicals archive ?
Research in authorship analysis dates back to 19th century itself on 'The Federalist Papers' (a series of 146 political essays written by John Jay, Alexander Hamilton, and James Madison, twelve of which claimed by both Hamilton and Madison) was definitely the most influential work in authorship attribution.
Applying authorship analysis to extremist-group web forum messages.
It also involves training that will help the researcher build on her existing experience as a court certified interpreter and a forensic linguist expert in authorship analysis.
Authorship analysis techniques can then reveal what messages come from the same individual.
John Hilton, Noel Reynolds, and Arlene Saxonhouse have employed statistical authorship analysis to claim that Hobbes authored three anonymously published works.
But the recent attribution of three discourses to Hobbes claims to rest on a new, more substantial method of proof -- statistical authorship analysis.
To cut through the confusion arising from the overlapping personal histories and writings of the three most significant candidates for authorship of the Horae, Hilton, Reynolds, and Saxonhouse employ the latest techniques of statistical authorship analysis to show that three of the discourses are written in a style indistinguishable from the style of Hobbes in his known works.
Despite precautions taken to increase the accuracy of authorship analysis, the test can generate false positives.