autodidacticism

(redirected from Autodidactism)

autodidacticism

(ˌɔːtəʊdɪˈdæktɪsɪzəm)
n
any self-directed learning or self-education
Translations
samouctví
References in periodicals archive ?
She believes that creativity can be taught, whether by higher education, community writing courses, writing conferences, and/or autodidactism.
In connection to these obstacles, the author offers a sophisticated close reading of Sor Juana's works pointing to the moments in which the writer makes reference to her autodidactism as well as to the rare times in which she had a teacher.
He is currently working on The Amateur: Autodidactism and the Colonial Literary Intellectual, a study of the literary intellectual from the global British Empire as an amateur and an autodidact.
However, I don't think that everything written by academics is good for a simple reason: All novelists and poets are necessarily autodidacts, if autodidactism is considered the opposite of academia.
43) Moreover, in order to legitimate that claim, that there can be no true scholar without mentor, Ibn Abi Usaybi'a quotes the entire text of Ibn Butlan's refutation of autodidactism, seven, paragraphs originally composed by Ibn Butlan as part of his correspondence with Ibn Ridwan.
We are to understand that Ibn Abi Usaybi'a construed Ibn Ridwan's valorization of autodidactism, of learning on one's own from books, as the singular violation of the Hippocratic Oath, the very text that served Ibn Ridwan as the scaffolding for his ethical sira.
Furthermore, the trope of autodidactism in the "sira" seems more consonant with the subject-matter of al-Kitab al-nafi' than with the Maqala ft l-tatarruq (although see the discussion by A.
By engaging Cary's dramatic response to Lodge's autodidactism, Shell argues for a reintegration of Cary's life and works.
Many suppose that the authorship question is a relic of nineteenth-century autodidactism and has been superseded by contemporary historical criticism several university courses in America now at least experiment with the proposition that Oxford wrote the plays.