autonomy

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au·ton·o·my

 (ô-tŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. au·ton·o·mies
1. The condition or quality of being autonomous; independence.
2.
a. Self-government or the right of self-government; self-determination.
b. Self-government with respect to local or internal affairs: granted autonomy to a national minority.
3. A self-governing state, community, or group.

[Greek autonomiā, from autonomos, self-ruling; see autonomous.]

au·ton′o·mist n.

autonomy

(ɔːˈtɒnəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the right or state of self-government, esp when limited
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a state, community, or individual possessing autonomy
3. freedom to determine one's own actions, behaviour, etc
4. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the doctrine that the individual human will is or ought to be governed only by its own principles and laws. See also categorical imperative
b. the state in which one's actions are autonomous
[C17: from Greek autonomia freedom to live by one's own laws; see autonomous]
auˈtonomist n

au•ton•o•my

(ɔˈtɒn ə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
1. independence or freedom, as of the will or one's actions.
2. the condition of being autonomous; self-government or the right of self-government; independence.
3. a self-governing community.
[1615–25; < Greek]

autonomy

- From Greek autos, "self," and nomos, "law," i.e. a person or unit that makes its own laws.
See also related terms for laws.

autonomy

1. the power or right of self-government.
2. a self-governing community. Cf. heteronymy.autonomous, adj.
See also: Government
independent self-rule free from outside influence.
See also: Freedom, Politics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.autonomy - immunity from arbitrary exercise of authority: political independenceautonomy - immunity from arbitrary exercise of authority: political independence
self-determination, self-government, self-rule - government of a political unit by its own people
independence, independency - freedom from control or influence of another or others
2.autonomy - personal independence
independence, independency - freedom from control or influence of another or others

autonomy

noun independence, freedom, sovereignty, self-determination, self-government, self-rule, self-sufficiency, home rule They stepped up their demands for local autonomy.
dependency, subjection, foreign rule

autonomy

noun
The condition of being politically free:
Translations
حُكْم ذاتيحُكْم ذاتِيّ
autonomie
selvstyreautonomi
autonomia
autonomija
sjálfsstjórn, sjálfstæîi
自治国家
자율자치권
autonomijaautonominis
autonomija
selvstyreautonomi
autonómia
autonomisjälvstyre
การปกครองตนเอง
quyền tự trị

autonomy

[ɔːˈtɒnəmɪ] Nautonomía f

autonomy

[ɔːˈtɒnəmi] nautonomie f

autonomy

nAutonomie f

autonomy

[ɔːˈtɒnəmɪ] nautonomia

autonomy

(oːˈtonəmi) noun
the power or right of a country etc to govern itself.
auˈtonomous adjective
self-governing.

autonomy

حُكْم ذاتِيّ autonomie selvstyre Autonomie αυτονομία autonomía autonomia autonomie autonomija autonomia 自治国家 자치권 autonomie selvstyre autonomia autonomia автономия självstyre การปกครองตนเอง özerklik quyền tự trị 自治

au·ton·o·my

n. autonomía, de funcionamiento propio.

autonomy

n autonomía; patient — autonomía del paciente
References in periodicals archive ?
Much like the Italian autonomists and reconstructed Marxists who augment class to a sphere of socioeconomic influences, Downing shuns the typical and narrow overemphasis on traditional disciplinary forms of knowledge making in favor of an epistemic field or "disciplinary matrix" (Downing 105).
Autonomists became known as 'Greens', the proponents of unilateral unification as 'Whites', front the colours of their candidate lists tot the November 'election', and these names survive today in Montenegrin politics.
He also addressed the autonomists of the eastern departments, saying that they were creating artificial differences between east and west, undermining Bolivian unity (see NotiSur, 2004-11-12).
Autonomists stand for all those politically active groups whose members sometimes launch terror attacks on authorities, symbolic objects, rivals, or stigmatized populations on their own territories without becoming durably organized specialists in coercion.
Currently in our society the justiciarists appear to have become too absolutist and they have the support of Government health policy and government-inspired community initiatives in favour of vaccination, as well as the orientation of health services, so the autonomists and beneficists are struggling.
With the collapse of Mulroney's coalition of western autonomists and moderate Quebec nationalists, there was no prospect of an entente a l'amiable if Quebec opted for sovereignty-association.
Next to typical left pessimism, autonomists can seem dreamily optimistic, seeing struggle and victory where others see apathy and defeat.
Following the Revolution of September 1852, Buenos Aires began its own reorganization and two political groups emerged: the Autonomists (or Localists) and the Nationalists.
The classical paradigm has thus been clearly and passionately defended by autonomists such as Remillard, Patenaude, and by Beetz in both his professorial and judicial capacities.
The majority faction of Puerto Rico's autonomists headed by Luis Munoz Rivera bartered its loyalty and support for the Liberal Party in the Spanish Cortes in exchange for concessions of enhanced self-rule.
In 1887, the Liberal Autonomists had been brutally driven out of political power in Ponce's municipal council by Spanish officials and the pro-Spanish Incondicional Party.
This arrangement proved unsatisfactory for most "provincial autonomists," as Robert Vipond aptly dubs the opponents of MacDonald's centralizing plans.