hearsay

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hear·say

 (hîr′sā′)
n.
1. Unverified information heard or received from another; rumor.
2. Law Evidence that is not within the personal knowledge of a witness, such as testimony regarding statements made by someone other than the witness, and that therefore may be inadmissible to establish the truth of a particular contention because the accuracy of the evidence cannot be verified through cross-examination.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hearsay

(ˈhɪəˌseɪ)
n
gossip; rumour
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hear•say

(ˈhɪərˌseɪ)

n.
unverified information acquired from another; rumor.
[1525–35; orig. in phrase by hear say, translation of Middle French par ouïr dire]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hearsay - gossip (usually a mixture of truth and untruth) passed around by word of mouthhearsay - gossip (usually a mixture of truth and untruth) passed around by word of mouth
scuttlebutt, gossip, comment - a report (often malicious) about the behavior of other people; "the divorce caused much gossip"
Adj.1.hearsay - heard through another rather than directly; "hearsay information"
indirect - extended senses; not direct in manner or language or behavior or action; "making indirect but legitimate inquiries"; "an indirect insult"; "doubtless they had some indirect purpose in mind"; "though his methods are indirect they are not dishonest"; "known as a shady indirect fellow"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

hearsay

noun rumour, talk, gossip, report, buzz, dirt (U.S. slang), word of mouth, tittle-tattle, talk of the town, scuttlebutt (slang, chiefly U.S.), idle talk, mere talk, on dit (French) Much of what was reported to them was hearsay.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

hearsay

noun
Idle, often sensational and groundless talk about others:
Slang: scuttlebutt.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
إشاعَه، تَقَوُّلات
doslech
rygte
hallomás
sögusögn, kvittur
čo sa vraví

hearsay

[ˈhɪəseɪ]
A. Nrumores mpl
it's just hearsayson rumores nada más
by hearsayde oídas
B. CPD hearsay evidence Ntestimonio m de oídas
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

hearsay

[ˈhɪərseɪ] non-dit m inv, rumeurs fpl
to know sth by hearsay → être au courant de qch par ouï-direhearsay evidence npreuve f par ouï-dire
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

hearsay

nGerüchte pl; to know something from or by hearsayetw vom Hörensagen wissen or haben; hearsay rule (Jur) Regel über den grundsätzlichen Ausschluss aller Beweise vom Hörensagen

hearsay

:
hearsay account
hearsay evidence
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

hearsay

[ˈhɪəˌseɪ] ndiceria, chiacchiere fpl
by hearsay → per sentito dire
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

hear

(hiə) verbpast tense, past participle heard (həːd)
1. to (be able to) receive (sounds) by ear. I don't hear very well; Speak louder – I can't hear you; I didn't hear you come in.
2. to listen to for some purpose. A judge hears court cases; Part of a manager's job is to hear workers' complaints.
3. to receive information, news etc, not only by ear. I've heard that story before; I hear that you're leaving; `Have you heard from your sister?' `Yes, I got a letter from her today'; I've never heard of him – who is he? This is the first I've heard of the plan.
ˈhearing noun
1. the ability to hear. My hearing is not very good.
2. the distance within which something can be heard. I don't want to tell you when so many people are within hearing; I think we're out of hearing now.
3. an act of listening. We ought to give his views a fair hearing.
4. a court case. The hearing is tomorrow.
ˈhearing-aid noun
a small electronic instrument which helps deaf people to hear better by making sounds louder by means of an amplifier.
ˈhearsay (-sei) noun
that which one has been told about by others but for which one has otherwise no evidence. I never trust anything that I learn by hearsay.
hear! hear!
a shout to show that one agrees with what a speaker has said (eg in Parliament or at a meeting).
I/he etc will/would not hear of
I, he etc will or would not allow. They would not hear of her going home alone, and insisted on going with her.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
[section] 18 (amending [section] 90.6063, Interpreter services for deaf persons); 2002-246, [section] 1 (amending [section] 90.5035, Sexual assault counselor-victim privilege); 2003-259, [section] 1 (amending [section] 90.104, Rulings on evidence); 2003-259, [section] 2 (amending 90.803, Hearsay exceptions; availability of declarant immaterial); and 2003-259, [section] 3 (amending 90.902, Self-authentication), Laws of Florida.

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