Avalokiteshvara


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Noun1.Avalokiteshvara - a male BodhisattvaAvalokiteshvara - a male Bodhisattva; widely associated with various gods and people
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It can get a tad boring and hot so we recommend visiting two other complexes before taking in the Siem Reap nightlife: the Ta Prohm complex with its towering trees that shot to international fame after Angelia Jolie's Lara Croft swung from behind them in 'Tomb Raider'; the other is Angkor Thom's Bayon temple with its 216 gargantuan smiling faces of Avalokiteshvara.
Visitors will also have the chance to explore a set of 11 new acquisitions, including an Avalokiteshvara Buddhist sculpture from China, Japanese Samurai armor and rare Ottoman horse armor.
(70) In a similar mode, pilgrims travelling from China to India testified to the power of prayers offered to Avalokiteshvara (Guanyin in China), who was specifically associated with cults for mariners.
The second tour de force is a thousand-year-old, over life-size fragmentary head of the bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara made in the complex--and of course, extremely fragile --'dry lacquer' technique that allows for particularly refined modelling and detailing (Fig.
A long panel, depicting eight life-size icons of the Bodhisatva Avalokiteshvara on its western gallery was once the highlight of the Banteay Chhmar temple.
The spectacular wooden statue of Avalokiteshvara in the Mahayana Pavilion measures 27.28 metres tall.
The most amazing thing is that there was an Indian style scroll painting of the five tantric manifestations of Avalokiteshvara (don zhags lha lnga), the tutelary deity of Mahapandita Shakyashri.
As far as I can tell, the Dalai Lama claims to be the manifestation of someone called Avalokiteshvara, who was apparently some sort of a god - though not the angry bearded divinity with which we non-Buddhists are familiar.
Highlights of the exhibition will include a woodblock image of Avalokiteshvara from the ninth century that was recovered from the desert oasis of Dunhuang.
[T]he perfectly enlightened Buddha, spoke to the Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara: 'Give me, gentle son, the queen, the great science of the six-syllable mantra with which I may liberate from suffering hundreds of thousands of millions of billions of various beings, so that I may cause [their souls] to reach unexcelled perfect enlightenment as swiftly as possible.
The main image in one of the Dukhangs is that of Avalokiteshvara, a Bodhisattva who embodies the compassion of all Buddhas, who is represented with 1,000 arms and 11 heads.
This role is indeed consistent with the Tibetan Buddhist notion that Dalai Lamas are incarnations of the Bodhisattva of Compassion, Avalokiteshvara.