bevacizumab

(redirected from Avastin)
Also found in: Medical.

bev·a·ciz·u·mab

 (bĕv′ə-sĭz′ə-măb′)
n.
A humanized monoclonal antibody that acts as an angiogenesis inhibitor, used intravenously to treat metastatic colorectal cancer and certain other types of cancer.

[beva-, origin unknown + -ci-, cardiovascular infix + -zu-, humanized + -m(onoclonal) a(nti)b(ody).]
References in periodicals archive ?
In January 2012, the announcement of Avastin's use in ovarian cancer created quite a bit of media excitement.
Summary: Fake versions of the multibillion-dollar cancer drug Avastin were purchased in Turkey before being traded by middlemen across the Middle East and Europe to the United States, an Egyptian businessman involved said on Tuesday.
Every shipment of Avastin or any other drug entering Egypt needs a Health Ministry license and is then subject to analysis before release, Yousef Ehab, Roche general manager in Egypt, told Reuters.
Food and Drug Administration withdrew approval for Avastin (bevacizumab), a drug used to treat metastatic breast cancer, on November 18, 2011, due to the risk of potentially serious side effects that include severe high blood pressure and hemorrhaging, as well as lack of evidence that the drug provides any benefit.
The approval of bevacizumab, the angiogenesis inhibitor marketed as Avastin, as a treatment for metastatic breast cancer is being withdrawn by the Food and Drug Administration, the agency announced.
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has alerted health care professionals that repackaged intravitreal injections of Avastin (bevacizumab) have caused a cluster of serious eye infections in the Miami, Florida.
The story of the use of Avastin for breast cancer treatment is a cautionary tale about how pharmaceutical companies dupe health care providers and consumers into accepting--even demanding--inferior drugs, and bully Federal agencies trying to protect the public.
Advocates of the controversial drug, Avastin, have called the treatment a life-saver, but an FDA panel agreed that the drug was not effective, caused dangerous side effects and ruled that its approval by the agency in 2008 should be revoked.
Roche's Avastin was on the march to becoming the world's
Women with advanced breast cancer who were treated with Roche Holding AG's (Basel CHE) Avastin were more likely to develop heart failure than other women, according to an analysis released last week that raised more concerns about the already troubled drug.
2010, SPA -- Federal health authorities are recommending the blockbuster drug Avastin no longer be used to treat breast cancer, saying recent studies failed to show the drug&'s original promise to help slow the disease.
The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (Nice) said Avastin (bevacizumab) offers "limited and uncertain benefit" for patients and does not lead to any significant extension of life.