Avenues


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Avenue, Avenues

 a double row of trees or pillars acting as a passageway, also used figuratively.
Examples: avenues of research; of thought; of wealth.
References in classic literature ?
The statues are all large; the palace is grand; the park covers a fair-sized county; the avenues are interminable.
At the intersection of two broad avenues Vas Kor descended from the street level to one of the great pneumatic stations of the city.
I directed Sola to proceed with Dejah Thoris along one of the less frequented avenues to the southern boundary of the city, where I would overtake them with the thoats as quickly as possible; then, leaving them to gather what food, silks, and furs we were to need, I slipped quietly to the rear of the first floor, and entered the courtyard, where our animals were moving restlessly about, as was their habit, before settling down for the night.
A long life has taught me that a man may seem weak where women and children are concerned and yet be anything but a weakling in the sterner avenues of life.
The procession moved along the main avenue some three-quarters of a mile, and then groups and couples began to slip aside into branch avenues, fly along the dismal corridors, and take each other by surprise at points where the corridors joined again.
She ran out sobbing into the garden and as far as the pond, along the avenues of young lime trees Prince Andrew had planted.
At length Soapy reached one of the avenues to the east where the glitter and turmoil was but faint.
Turan hesitated a moment in the face of almost certain discovery and then, assured that they must take him for one of their own people, he moved boldly into the avenue. Having no idea of the direction in which he might best hope to find what he sought, and not wishing to arouse suspicion by further hesitation, he turned to the left and stepped briskly along the pavement with the intention of placing himself as quickly as possible beyond the observation of those nocturnal watchers.
The rows of trees, running at right angles, enabled him to see along only one narrow avenue at a time.
"Let's go home around by Spofford Avenue," suggested Gilbert.
The house in itself was already an historic document, though not, of course, as venerable as certain other old family houses in University Place and lower Fifth Avenue. Those were of the purest 1830, with a grim harmony of cabbage- rose-garlanded carpets, rosewood consoles, round-arched fire-places with black marble mantels, and immense glazed book-cases of mahogany; whereas old Mrs.
On the other side of the gate a sandy driver disappeared into an avenue of ragged and stunted elm trees, which effectually concealed any view of the house.