Averroism


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Averroism

(ˌævəˈrəʊɪzəm; əˈvɛrəʊ-)
n
(Philosophy) the teachings of Averroës
ˌAverˈroist n
ˌAverroˈistic adj

Averroism, Averrhoism

the philosophy of Averroës, chiefly Aristotelianism tinged with Neoplatonism, asserting the unity of an active and divine intellect common to all while denying personal immortality. — Averroist, Averrhoist, n.Averroistic, Averrhoistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Averroism was among the direst of heresies, founded on the idea of the Possible Intellect, shared by all humanity, allowing us all to think the identical thought when we think a rational truth, such as a mathematical fact.
Averroism was a central problem in the Parisian reading of Aristotle (see Torrell, 191-94).
Abstract: One of the definitive aspects of the relationship between Ramon Llull and the University of Paris was his opposition to Latin Averroism.
1420-1499), the key figure of Averroism in fifteenth-century Padua.
8) Latin Averroism', often still partitioned in the case of the 13th century into the First and Second Averroism, is a much debated label deriving from Ernest Renan which conceals a cluster of images reflective of the complexities of the period that introduces Aristotelian thinking by the aid of the Arabian lens into Christian ambience (see DMA 2004:118-120, Hayoun and Libera 1991).
The essay will conclude with some thoughts concerning the significance of Descartes's "revised Averroism.
He also steers clear of the heterodoxy of Averroism which would replace individual intellects with a created universal intellectus agens.
In fact, Averroism (following Ibn Rushd) was the dominant influence in Western thought from the thirteenth to the sixteenth centuries.
30) Indeed, one might argue that this work of commentary, far from demonstrating an impulse to "correlational" thinking, suggests instead an "anti-correlational" historical undermining of the emergent Averroism in the Faculty of Arts.
De acuerdo con Spivakoski "Don Diego saw his own country as a reasonable place, where adherents of the most divergent beliefs--"moro, marrano, philisopho"--as he distinguishes the most obvious ones--could live side by side with Catholics, so long as everyone conformed outwardly" (Diego Hurtado de Mendoza and Averroism 319).
In chapter seven (281-82), Cide Hamete's Averroism (the Second Author calls him "filosofo mahometico" in part two, chapter fifty-three) is part and parcel of a "mocking of religion" encompassing three specific moments from part one: the shirttail rosary with which Don Quixote does penance in Sierra Morena; parallels between the oxcart used to transport Don Quixote at the end of part one and a cart used by the Philistines to transport the Ark of the Covenant; and Dulcinea/Aldonza's powerful voice from atop a tower calling her father's workers, which Johnson compares to the muezzin who calls the faithful to prayer from the minaret of a masque.
The ideological battles involved were so precocious that concepts that would have been easily identified some years later, such as Aristotelianism, natural philosophy, and, above all, Averroism, were totally unknown by anyone capable of shining some light on what was happening in Leon around that time.