Averroism

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Averroism

(ˌævəˈrəʊɪzəm; əˈvɛrəʊ-)
n
(Philosophy) the teachings of Averroës
ˌAverˈroist n
ˌAverroˈistic adj

Averroism, Averrhoism

the philosophy of Averroës, chiefly Aristotelianism tinged with Neoplatonism, asserting the unity of an active and divine intellect common to all while denying personal immortality. — Averroist, Averrhoist, n.Averroistic, Averrhoistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
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This understanding seems to result partly from Averroistic influences, partly from Thomas's desire to make Avicenna's system--in spite of the presence of obvious tensions in it--completely coherent, and partly from some (unwarranted) rewordings which fit better Thomas's own system.
countered both the Averroistic interpretations of Aristotle and the Franciscan tendency to reject Greek philosophy.
2010) Spinoza on Philosophy and Religion: The Averroistic Sources.
20) Judson Boyce Allen, "Hermann the German's Averroistic Aristotle and Medieval Poetic Theory," Mosaic 9 (1976): 68.
Of the 219 theses condemned by Tempier, many were Averroistic in nature.
39) Strauss insists, on the contrary, that Aristotle unequivocally asserts natural right's mutability, and Strauss ultimately places Aristotle's concept of justice somewhere between the Averroistic view that natural right is a product of human convention and what Strauss perceives to be the moral absolutist reading rendered by Thomas.
On the other hand, there was certainly a reaction against Arab science in the thirteenth century, culminating in the Parisian condemnations of Averroistic propositions.
Neither the Manichean tradition nor the Averroistic double truth was what was intended or employed.
Des Chene inadvertently reveals from the start that his expertise is rather limited in that direction, when on the very first page he describes Averroes's commentaries as "profoundly revisionary, and troubling," and then goes on to describe Averroistic monopsychism as the doctrine that all human beings share a single agent intellect.
Strauss implies, however, that Machiavelli himself was sympathetic to the Averroistic tradition of classical political philosophy which justified the pursuit of the philosophic life in terms of the natural needs of the city.
Probably de Lubac exaggerated, and interpreted Aristotle in too Averroistic a sense, when he said that for Aristotle human nature remained "shut up within its own order.