axil

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ax·il

 (ăk′sĭl)
n.
The upper angle between a lateral organ, such as a leaf, and the stem that bears it.

[Latin axilla, armpit.]

axil

(ˈæksɪl)
n
(Botany) the angle between the upper surface of a branch or leafstalk and the stem from which it grows
[C18: from Latin axilla armpit]

ax•il

(ˈæk sɪl)

n.
the angle between the upper side of a leaf or stem and the supporting stem or branch.
[1785–95; < Latin axilla armpit]

ax·il

(ăk′sĭl)
The angle between the upper side of a leaf or stem and the stem or branch that supports it. A bud is usually found in the axil.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.axil - the upper angle between an axis and an offshoot such as a branch or leafstalkaxil - the upper angle between an axis and an offshoot such as a branch or leafstalk
angle - the space between two lines or planes that intersect; the inclination of one line to another; measured in degrees or radians
Translations
Blattachsel
잎겨드랑이
References in classic literature ?
The whole tree itself is but one leaf, and rivers are still vaster leaves whose pulp is intervening earth, and towns and cities are the ova of insects in their axils.
The tiny white flowers are formed in the axils and transform into the familiar clusters of bright red berries, which are eaten by birds and deer, without ill-effect, but poisonous to humans.
Inflorescences are usually single flowered, and can appear from the leaf axils or be terminal.
Some produce tiny bulbs, or bulbils, in their leaf axils.
Inflorescences composed of dyads, triads or monads grouped in spikes or racemes, found in the leaf axils or solitary.
veluticarpa by its larger laminas with more numerous lateral veins, eglandular petioles, inflorescences borne in the axils of the earliest deciduous leaves, and patchily glabrescent mature fruits.
I took out all the unwanted growth from the axils so now, with liquid tomato feed in their water, they can really concentrate on making fruit.
Podetia 1-3 cm tall, 1-3 mm thick, brownish to grayish, with white patches, not melanotic at base, slightly to moderately branched; branching type anisotomic dichotomy; axils open to closed; tips subulate, ascyphose.
Panicles may be present on the head of the plant or may emerge from the axils on the stem.
For each examined bromeliad, the number of leaves and leaf axils was registered, along with base width and longest leaf length, largest diameter and plant height (from the rosette base to the top of the highest leaf) and its distance from the soil.