Aymara


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Ay·ma·ra

 (ī′mä-rä′, ī′mə-)
n. pl. Aymara or Ay·ma·ras
1. A member of a South American Indian people inhabiting parts of highland Bolivia and Peru.
2. The Aymaran language of the Aymara.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Aymara

(ˌaɪməˈrɑː)
npl -ras or -ra
1. (Peoples) a member of a South American Indian people of Bolivia and Peru
2. (Languages) the language of this people, probably related to Quechua
[from Spanish aimará, of American Indian origin]
ˌAymaˈran adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ay•ma•ra

(ˌaɪ mɑˈrɑ)

n., pl. -ras, (esp. collectively) -ra.
1. an American Indian language spoken on the Altiplano of S Peru, Bolivia, and N Chile.
2. a speaker of Aymara.
[1855–60]
Ay`ma•ran′, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
لغة أيمارا
аймара
aimara
ajmarština
aymara
Aymara
Ajmara lingvo
aimaraaymaraidioma aimara
aimaraaimaran kieli
aimaraaymara
आयमारा
ajmarski jezikAymara
bahasa Aymara
aímaríska
lingua aymara
アイマラアイマラ語
아이마라어
aimarųaimarų kalba
aimaru valoda
Aymara
aymara
język ajmara
aimarálíngua aimará
ajmarščina
ајмара
aymara
Aymara
аймара

Aymara

[ˌaɪməˈrɑː]
A. ADJaimara, aimará
B. N
1. (= person) → aimara mf, aimará mf
2. (Ling) → aimara m, aimará m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
They were celebrating Dia de las Natitas (nya-TEE-tass), a festival observed by the country's second largest indigenous group, the Aymara, each year.
The book contains b&w decorative illustrations, along with a glossary of Spanish, Quechua, and Aymara terms.
Below us were the coloured tarpaulins of one of the world's largest markets, Feria 16 de Julio; along both sides were some of the psychedelic-looking buildings that have become the signature works of indigenous Aymara architect Freddy Mamani Silvestre.
He has become the go-to architect of Aymara rich traders-an emerging elite class of citizens who share his indigenous roots.