Azanian

A·za·ni·a

 (ə-zā′nē-ə, ə-zān′yə)
South Africa. In the apartheid era, the term was often used by black African nationalists.

A·za′ni·an adj. & n.

Azanian

(əˈzɑːnɪən; əˈzɑːnjən)
n
(Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Azania (another name used esp by many Black political activists for South Africa)
adj
(Placename) of or relating to Azania
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References in periodicals archive ?
van Wyk Louw, contributed a chapter on the Tristia to the Blackwell Companion to Ovid (edited by Peter Knox, 2009) and also a chapter on DDT Jabavu, Professor of Latin at Fort Hare, for Grant Parker's Azanian Muse (forthcoming).
The African National Congress, the Pan Africanist Congress, the Azanian Peoples Organization and other militant resistance movements were banned at this period within the country, their enforced exclusion from political activity registering here as the estranging space between parallel tracks:
In June 1961, the ANC established Umkhonto we Sizwe (the Spear of the Nation) and the PAC formed its military wing known as the Azanian People's Liberation Army (APLA).
The parties are Afrika Borwa Kgutlisa Botho, Ahanang People's Organisation, AParty, Azanian Native Socialist Congress, Conservative Party, Dabalorivhuwa Patriotic Front, Freedom Power, Khoisan United Front, United Citizen Forum of South Africa and Workers International Vanguard.
The man who ordered countless killings as part of the battle to end apartheid - and the Azanian People's Liberation Army (APLA) commander who ordered the attack which killed Lyndi.
Ballon--purloins the letter, the French minister is convinced the moves represent a secret code.) In fact, nothing could be further from Sir Sampson's mind than Azanian politics; he cannot even remember the proper names of the principal personalities at court.
(28) Azanian Peoples Organization v President of the Republic of South Africa [1996] 4 SALR 671, 676 ('AZAPO').
These were Umkhonto we Sizwe of the African National Congress, the Azanian People's Liberation Army of the Pan-African Congress, and the KwaZulu Self-Protection Force of the Inkatha Freedom Party.
The two cases that most clearly demonstrate the process that I am talking about are, first, that of the anti-white serial killer Simon Mpungose, and second, that of the political war between the United Democratic Front (UDF) and the Azanian People's Organization (AZAPO) in the townships near Johannesburg.
The attack was ordered by Letlapa Mphahlele, at the time operations commander of the Azanian People's Liberation Army.
The attacks were carried out by five young members of the Azanian People's Organisation - an ultra left-wing organisation which advocated giving South Africa's land back to its black residents.