Aztec

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Az·tec

 (ăz′tĕk′)
n.
1. A member of a people of central Mexico whose civilization was at its height at the time of the Spanish conquest in the early 16th century.
2. The Nahuatl language of the Aztecs.
adj. also Az·tec·an (-tĕk′ən)
Of or relating to the Aztecs or their language, culture, or empire.

[Spanish Azteca, from Nahuatl Aztecatl, one who comes from the place of the cranes : áztatl, crane + -técatl, suff.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Aztec

(ˈæztɛk)
n
1. (Peoples) a member of a Mexican Indian people who established a great empire, centred on the valley of Mexico, that was overthrown by Cortés and his followers in the early 16th century
2. (Languages) the language of the Aztecs. See also Nahuatl
adj
3. (Languages) of, relating to, or characteristic of the Aztecs, their civilization, or their language
4. (Peoples) of, relating to, or characteristic of the Aztecs, their civilization, or their language
[C18: from Spanish Azteca, from Nahuatl Aztecatl, from Aztlan, their traditional place of origin, literally: near the cranes, from azta cranes + tlan near]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Az•tec

(ˈæz tɛk)

n.
1. a member of a Nahuatl-speaking ethnic group that ruled much of central and S Mexico prior to the Spanish conquest in 1521.
2. any Nahuatl-speaking Indian of the Valley of Mexico in the period prior to and immediately following the Spanish conquest.
adj.
4. of or pertaining to the Aztecs or the culture of central Mexico during the period of Aztec dominance.
Az′tec•an, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Aztec

1. AD 1325–1521 Invading Aztec tribes ended the ruling Toltec power and in 1325 founded Tenochtitlán (now Mexico City). Aztecs were Indians rich with gold and silver, and medicinal skills. They composed poetry and music. Their state was militaristic, with a large, well-equipped army. Human sacrifice was the basis for faith according to Aztec religion. Between 1519 and 1521 Hernando Cortés and 400 Spanish troops invaded and defeated this Central American civilization.
2. A member of a people who ruled an empire in central Mexico and were overthrown by Spanish conquistadors under Cortès in the 16th century.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aztec - a member of the Nahuatl people who established an empire in Mexico that was overthrown by Cortes in 1519
Nahuatl - a member of any of various Indian peoples of central Mexico
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
atsteekkinahuanahuatl
Azekaztečkinahuatl

Aztec

[ˈæztek]
A. ADJazteca
B. Nazteca mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Aztec

[ˈæztɛk]
adjaztèque
nAztèque mf
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Aztec

nAzteke m, → Aztekin f
adjaztekisch
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Aztec

[ˈæztɛk]
1. adjazteco/a
2. n (person) → azteco/a; (language) → azteco
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The Aztec civilization also used urine to heal wounds while Hindu practices noted the benefits of drinking one's own urine.
The contribution of the Aztec civilization is the cultivation of maize (corn), which has remained in Mexican cookery as a major element, used mostly in making tortillas, their bread.
She witnesses the destruction of the Aztec civilization at the hands of the conquistadors, and fear sets in as she realizes she is standing, "in the middle of the world's ashes" (9).
Deadly Baggage: What Cortes Brought to Mexico and How It Destroyed the Aztec Civilization
Discussion encompasses the classic Maya civilization, the 260-day calendar and the 365-day calendar of the postclassic Yucatec civilization, the Burner ceremonies of quadripartite 65-day intervals, and the 52-year calendar of the postclassic Aztec civilization. The final section addresses the ritual practice of time in connection with sociology, politics, eschatology, and cosmogony, among other perspectives.
Give students an opportunity to design an article of clothing that celebrates the iconography and motifs of the Aztec civilization. Give students time to work online researching the art of ancient Mexico between the years 900 and 1500.
The realistic presentations of peasants, revolutionaries as well as gods of the ancient Aztec civilization vibrate in the sun.