anno Domini

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an·no Dom·i·ni

 (ăn′ō dŏm′ə-nī′, -nē′)
adv. Abbr. AD or ad
In a specified year of the Christian era.

[Medieval Latin annō Dominī : Latin annō, ablative of annus, year + Latin Dominī, genitive of Dominus, Lord.]

anno Domini

(ˈænəʊ ˈdɒmɪˌnaɪ; -ˌniː)
adv
the full form of AD
n
informal advancing old age
[Latin: in the year of our Lord]

ad1

(æd)

n.
1. an advertisement.
2. advertising: an ad agency.
[1835–45; by shortening]

ad2

(æd)

n. Tennis.
[1925–30; by shortening]

ad-

a prefix occurring in verbs or verbal derivatives borrowed from Latin, where it meant “toward” and indicated direction, tendency, or addition: adjoin. For variants before a following consonant, see a-5, ac-, af-, ag-, al-, an-2, ap-1, ar-, as-, at-.
[< Latin ad, ad- (preposition and prefix) to, toward, at, about; c. at1]

-ad1

,
1. a suffix occurring in loanwords from Greek denoting a group or unit comprising a certain number, sometimes of years: myriad; Olympiad; triad.
2. a suffix meaning “derived from,” “related to,” “associated with,” occurring in loanwords from Greek (dryad; oread) and in New Latin coinages on a Greek model (bromeliad; cycad).
3. a suffix used, on the model of Iliad, in the names of epics, speeches, etc., derived from proper names: Dunciad; jeremiad.
[< Greek -ad-, s. of -as]

-ad2

,
var. of -ade1: ballad; salad.

-ad3

,
a suffix used in anatomy to form adverbs from nouns signifying parts of the body, denoting a direction toward that part: ectad.
[< Latin ad toward, anomalously suffixed to the noun]

A.D.

or AD,

1. in the year of the Lord; since Christ was born: Charlemagne was born in a.d.742.
(Latin annō Dominī]
2. assembly district.
3. athletic director.
usage: The abbreviation a.d. was orig. placed before a date and is still usu. preferred in edited writing: The Roman conquest of Britain began in a.d.43 (or, sometimes, began a.d.43). The abbreviation b.c. (before Christ) is always placed after a date: Caesar was assassinated in 44 b.c. But by analogy with the position of b.c., a.d. is frequently found after the date in all types of writing: Claudius I lived from 10 b.c.to 54 a.d. This abbreviation may also designate centuries, being placed after the century specified: the second century a.d. Some writers prefer to use c.e. (Common Era) and b.c.e. (Before the Common Era) to avoid the religious overtones of a.d. and b.c.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.anno Domini - in the Christian era; used before dates after the supposed year Christ was born; "in AD 200"
Translations
après Jésus-Christ
etter Kristus

Anno Domini

[ˈænəʊˈdɒmɪnaɪ] N (frm) Anno Domini 43el año 43 después de Jesucristo
the third century Anno Dominiel siglo tercero de Cristo

anno Domini

n
(abbr AD) → nach Christus, Anno Domini; in 53 anno Dominiim Jahre 53 nach Christus
(inf: = age) → Alter nt

Anno Domini

[ˈænəʊˈdɒmɪnaɪ] advanno Domini