BCG vaccine


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BCG vaccine

 (bē′sē-jē′)
n.
A preparation consisting of attenuated human tubercle bacilli that is used for immunization against tuberculosis.

[B(acillus) C(almette-)G(uérin) vaccine.]

BCG vaccine


n.
a vaccine made from weakened strains of tubercle bacilli, used to produce immunity against tuberculosis.
[1925–30; B(acillus)C(almette)-G(uérin)]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Welsh Government's multi-million trial in north Pembrokeshire was halted this week due to a global shortage of BCG vaccine supplies.
INTRODUCTION: BCG vaccine has been in use since 1921 and is regarded to be a safe vaccine.
Designed to boost the immune responses that have been primed by the BCG vaccine, MVA85A has been undergoing human trials for more than a decade, showing it to be safe and to stimulate a high level of immune response in adults.
Vaccine manufacturing in the Central Research Institute, Pasteur Institute of India and the BCG Vaccine Laboratory was suspended on January 15, 2008, for being non- compliant to good manufacturing practices ( GMP).
Stocks of the BCG vaccine ran out in early December due to a licensing problem with the Danish company Statens Serum Institut which supplies it to all European countries.
Many studies report a higher BCG vaccine efficacy against lepromatous forms of leprosy compared to non-lepromatous forms, (2,6-8,10-15) confirming that such a shift may indeed take place, though some studies report a higher vaccine efficacy against non-lepromatous leprosy.
Since 1989, batches of BCG vaccine have been on a stability monitoring programme of which nine have had sub-potent results at one or more time points and had therefore failed to meet their end of shelf-life potency criteria," it said.
Exactly who gets the jab from now on:From this month the BCG vaccine against tuberculosis will no longer be offered to all school children.
The group, which caused controversy when it was awarded the Government contract to supply smallpox vaccine, said it was recalling the BCG vaccine following the temporary suspension of its licence for the vaccine in Ireland.
A spokesman for the Scottish Executive said: "The shortage of the BCG vaccine was a UK issue due to problems in the manufacture of the only product licensed for use in the UK.
Some evidence suggests that the BCG vaccine, which many people receive to protect against tuberculosis, confers partial immunity to Buruli ulcer.
Despite these dismal statistics, the world has not seen a new TB vaccine since the 1920s, when the original BCG vaccine (currently used to vaccinate 85% of newborns in the world) was discovered.