BRCA1

(redirected from BRCAI)
Also found in: Medical.

BRCA1

n.
A gene that is associated with the development of familial breast cancer when inherited in a defective state.

[br(east) ca(ncer) 1.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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medical history of breast cancer might seek BRCAi testing.
Moreover genetic ablation of breast cancer 1 (Brcai)-encoding gene increased ROS and mammary tumor formation frequency in p53-heterozygous mice [147].
single, zero 12 children) Claire (age 30, BRCAI, married, zero 13 children) Macie (age 31, BRCAI, married, two 14 children) Theme Quotes Engage in two-way dialogue I think it's important to make the spouse feel they have a say in things.
The BRCAI gene mutations, made famous by Angelina Jolie, raise a woman's chance of developing breast cancer during her lifetime from 12 percent to roughly 65 percent.
BRCAI : exon 1-24 (exon 4 is not existing), BRCA2: exon 1-25 (exons 5 and 6, and 23 and 24 are combined, respectively).
It can also screen for mutations in genes that are known to increase cancer risk, such as BRCAI and BRCA2, which are linked to a much higher chance of developing breast and ovarian cancer.
Ademas, el gen supresor de tumor BRCAI (Breast Cancer1) tambien ha sido identificado como un blanco de miR-15a y miR-16 (Zhu et al., 2009).
BRCAI pathway dysfunction is also the basis of treatment of BLBC with poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors.
She made the choice after receiving genetic test results that indicated she carries a mutation on her BRCAI gene that significantly increases the risk of some types of breast or ovarian cancer.* Her candor about this important medical decision sparked a flurry of interest from the media, health care professionals, and--perhaps most importantly--other women.
1990 Mary-Claire King of the University of California at Berkeley discovers the location of BRCAI gene.
(13) After filing multiple applications with the United States Patent and Trademark Office ("USPTO"), the two isolated naturally-occurring genes referred to as "BRCAI" and "BRCA2" eventually became the intellectual property of the University of Utah Research Foundation ("UURF") and its exclusive licensee, Myriad Genetics ("Myriad").